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Arizona State University—Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law


Armstrong Hall, 1100 S. McAllister Avenue, PO Box 877906
Tempe, AZ 85287-7906
Phone: 480.965.1474; Fax: 480.727.7930
E-mail: law.admissions@asu.edu; Website: www.law.asu.edu

Introduction

Founded in 1967, the Arizona State University—Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law combines the best traditions of American legal education with innovative programs supported by strong community partnerships. Our vision includes excellence in all we do, striving to have a meaningful impact on contemporary problems through teaching, research, and collaborative problem-solving. Students are attracted by the quality of the legal education, commitment to innovative teaching and scholarship, reasonable tuition, breadth and depth of the curriculum, numerous opportunities for experiential learning, and excellent student-to-faculty ratio. A busy calendar of conferences, seminars, and speakers enriches the student experience and fosters a strong sense of community. The college has an outstanding faculty, many opportunities for interdisciplinary learning, extensive pro bono opportunities, an exceptional legal writing program, and clinics of significant variety. Our students benefit greatly from the fact that Phoenix is the sixth largest city in the country and a state capital.

Admission

Every completed application receives full review and consideration by the Admissions Committee prior to a decision. Among the factors influencing the admission decision are undergraduate and previous graduate education, LSAT performance, quality and grading patterns of undergraduate institutions, demonstrated commitment to public service, work experience, leadership experience, extracurricular or community activities, history of overcoming economic or other disadvantages, personal experiences with discrimination, overcoming disability, geographic diversity, uniqueness of experience and background, maturity, ability to communicate, foreign language proficiency, honors and awards, service in the armed forces, publications, and exceptional personal talents.

Career Strategy and Professional Development Mentoring Center

Our graduates have proven success in the legal employment market and hold prominent positions and leadership roles throughout the international, national, and Arizona legal communities in business, politics, government, the judiciary, and private firms. A broad range of employers interview our students on campus, at regional interview programs sponsored by the career center, and at job fairs. Through attorney-student mentor programs, speaker series and panels, networking events, career fairs, a large on-campus recruitment program, and individual career counseling, the career center's professional staff serves students in all phases of their professional development and job search.

Curriculum

The College of Law offers one of the best student-to-faculty ratios in the country and a wide variety of courses. Because we have a large, nationally acclaimed faculty with high standards in both teaching and research, we have unusual depth in our course offerings. More than 70 percent of the classes in the second and third year have fewer than 20 students. As part of a premier research institution, the opportunities for interdisciplinary work are extensive. Concurrent degrees are offered with the MBA program, the MSW, the PhD in Psychology, the PhD in Justice and Social Inquiry, and the MD with Mayo Medical School. Further, the college takes full advantage of its unique location in Phoenix by offering about 250 externships and countless opportunities to do pro bono work. Students also have wonderful opportunities to develop their legal writing skills because of our commitment to maintaining an excellent legal writing program.

Clinical Programs

The law school's Clinical Program offers students unparalleled opportunities to practice law in a variety of settings with people who have real legal problems. We offer more than 12 separate clinics and clinical units—civil justice, criminal practice, family violence, healthcare entrepreneurship, immigration, Indian law, innovation advancement, mediation, patent litigation, post-conviction, and public defender—a greater variety of clinics than most law schools of any size. Under the supervision of faculty members who are experts in their subject matter, students manage real cases and represent clients in hearings and trials before courts and administrative agencies, assist in the commercialization and monetization of new technologies, and mediate cases pending in the judicial system. Because of our small student body, we are able to accommodate nearly every student who expresses an interest in the experiential learning offered through the Clinical Program.

Student Activities

To prepare proactive, socially conscious attorneys and leaders, we enhance the traditional classroom experience with many extracurricular and cocurricular activities. We have about 50 active student groups, from the ASU Bar Association and about 30 professional affiliations to 20 pro bono groups. Plus, we grow and change with the interests of our students. On average, about 70 percent of our students participate in pro bono work of some kind, with about one-third of the student body graduating with Pro Bono Distinction. Students are active in ASU student governance and in our communities with public service. Our students are competitive in moot court competitions, both regionally and internationally. Two traditional law journals, the Arizona State Law Journal and Jurimetrics, and two new online journals, the Law Journal for Social Justice and the Sports and Entertainment Law Journal, allow additional professional development opportunities for students.

Library and Physical Facilities

The College of Law is composed of Armstrong Hall and the John J. Ross-William C. Blakley Law Library and is set on the eastern edge of the university's beautiful, 700-acre Tempe campus. Armstrong Hall houses the majority of our classrooms, faculty and administrative offices, clinics, and centers, in addition to a café and spacious community areas. The Ross-Blakley Law Library is a stunningly beautiful work of architecture with lots of windows to allow natural light in. Both Armstrong Hall and the Ross-Blakley Law Library are fully equipped with a wireless network.

Center for Law, Science, and Innovation

Founded in 1984, the Center for Law, Science, and Innovation is the oldest, largest, and most comprehensive law and science center in the country. Through the Center, students may receive a certificate in Law, Science, and Technology, specializing in environmental law, genomics and biotechnology law, health law, intellectual property law, or law and psychology. Every year, 10 students from each class are named Center Scholars. Center faculty and students edit and copublish, along with the American Bar Association, the prestigious, peer-refereed Jurimetrics: The Journal of Law, Science, and Technology, the oldest and most widely circulated journal in the field of law and science.

The Center for Law and Global Affairs

The Center for Law and Global Affairs supports and inspires research, education, and practice regarding new forms of transnational public-private governance that extend beyond the traditional paradigms of international law. The Center sponsors conferences, colloquia, courses, research, policy initiatives, and publications to study evolving forms of international law, to develop and apply new methodologies to better understand how the rule of law operates in diverse international contexts, to initiate and communicate new policy strategies, and to teach and train students and professionals to work more effectively in the new global regulatory environment. The Center creates an interdisciplinary community of scholars, practitioners, students, and community members interested in better understanding and affecting the relationship between law and an increasingly global world.

The Diane Halle Center for Family Justice

The Diane Halle Center for Family Justice, working with other ASU schools and with community partners, is pursuing direct representation and policy advocacy on core issues of domestic violence, juvenile justice, child abuse, family law, and human rights of children and families through multidisciplinary initiatives in education, advocacy, and scholarship. The Center was established with a $1 million grant from the Bruce T. Halle Family Foundation. The Center houses the Ruth V. McGregor Family Protection Clinic and the Anti-Sex Trafficking Initiative.

Indian Legal Program

The Indian Legal Program enjoys a position of national preeminence. This preeminence is due to the large Native American student population, the Indian Law Certificate program, well-respected faculty, the Indian law curriculum, well-placed alumni, scholarly conferences, and the Indian Legal Clinic. An extraordinary faculty and long-term partnerships with tribal governments contribute to the strength and reputation of the College of Law in this critical area.

LLM Programs

The Master of Laws (LLM) program allows one year of post-JD study tailored to the scholarly and practice interests of participating students. Lawyers may pursue an LLM in Biotechnology and Genomics or an LLM in Tribal Policy, Law, and Government. Some may choose to pursue an LLM focusing on global legal studies, health law and policy, or any of the other areas of strength in the law school's curriculum.

Applicant Profile

Arizona State University—Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

This grid includes only applicants who earned 120–180 LSAT scores under standard administrations.

  GPA    
LSAT
Score
3.75+
Apps
3.75+
Adm
3.50–
3.74 Apps
3.50–
3.74 Adm
3.25–
3.49 Apps
3.25–
3.49 Adm
3.00–
3.24 Apps
3.00–
3.24 Adm
2.75–
2.99 Apps
2.75–
2.99 Adm
2.50–
2.74 Apps
2.50–
2.74 Adm
2.25–
2.49 Apps
2.25–
2.49 Adm
2.00–
2.24 Apps
2.00–
2.24 Adm
Below 2.00
Apps
Below 2.00
Adm
No GPA
Apps
No GPA
Adm
Total
Apps
Total
Adm
175–180 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5
170–174 11 10 10 10 7 7 6 4 4 3 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 35
165–169 54 54 70 68 51 46 35 28 24 7 14 1 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 254 204
160–164 112 107 167 142 131 63 92 16 27 1 18 1 19 2 6 1 0 0 8 2 580 335
155–159 122 42 173 15 145 2 96 3 47 1 24 0 9 0 3 0 0 0 13 2 632 65
150–154 65 5 79 2 79 3 84 3 39 0 28 0 12 0 9 0 1 0 7 0 403 13
145–149 15 1 43 3 59 0 46 1 30 0 15 0 4 0 3 0 1 0 4 0 220 5
140–144 7 0 16 0 21 0 27 0 18 0 10 0 13 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 117 0
135–139 2 0 3 0 5 0 9 0 9 0 5 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 41 0
130–134 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 14 0
125–129 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 8 0
120–124 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0
Total 389 220 563 241 502 123 399 55 202 12 125 4 68 2 28 1 5 0 38 4 2319 662

Apps = Number of Applicants
Adm = Number Admitted
Reflects 99% of the total applicant pool; highest LSAT data reported.