Schedule: Best Practices in High-Stakes Testing Conference

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Conference Schedule

February 7–8, 2019

Please note: The schedule will be updated as more details become available.

5:00 p.m. Registration

Registration is open from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. Reception (heavy hors d’oeuvres)

Welcoming Remarks

8:00 a.m. Registration & Breakfast

Registration and breakfast will be available from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

9:00 a.m. Introduction

Outline for the Day

Lily Knezevich (LSAC)

Remarks: Goals for the Sessions

Kellye Testy (LSAC) and Judith Gundersen (NCBE)

9:15 a.m. High-Stakes Testing: The Fundamentals

Plenary by Gage Kingsbury (Psychometric Consulting)
Moderated by Kellye Testy (LSAC)

Dr. Kingsbury will introduce the concepts of validity, reliability, and fairness. The difference between an admission test (predicting future performance based on relevant skills) versus a certification/licensure test will be explored, as well as how the purpose of a test affects its design.

10:15 a.m. Break

15-minute break

10:30 a.m. Implications of Standardization: Test Security for LSAT and Bar Exam

Plenary by James Wollack (University of Wisconsin)
Moderated by Judith Gundersen (NCBE)

Professor James Wollack will explore the implications of testing standards (validity, reliability, and fairness) for test administration, including test security.

11:30 a.m. Panel Discussion: How Formative and Summative Assessments Differ from a Standardized Admission Test (LSAT) and a Licensure (Bar Exam)

Presented by William Adams (ABA), Gage Kingsbury (Psychometric Consulting), and Mark Raymond (National Board of Medical Examiners)
Moderated by Camille deJorna (LSAC)

The panel will discuss Standard 314 of the ABA Standards for Admission to the Bar, its history, and its implementation. In addition, the panel will explain the nature and evaluation of formative and summative assessments.

12:15 p.m. Lunch

Lunch will be available from 12:15 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m. Workshops (Session 1)

Choose between the following workshops:

Building Formative and Summative Assessments

Presented by Gage Kingsbury (Psychometric Consulting) and Lily Knezevich (LSAC)
Moderated by Kellye Testy (LSAC)

Effective classroom assessments are fundamental to evaluating student progress and growth towards the goals of the course or curriculum. Ideally, formative assessments guide instruction by enabling the professor to adapt instruction to the needs of individual students. This workshop will provide information on creating effective formative and summative assessments and provide an opportunity for the participants to discuss their classroom experiences.

How the LSAT Is Created and Scored

Presented by James Lorié (LSAC) and Josiah Evans (LSAC)

This session will illustrate how the LSAT is created, scored, and validated. We will examine the standards—including logical and conceptual soundness, as well as fairness to all test takers—that guide the development of LSAT test questions. We will also review the processes LSAC has put in place to ensure that LSAT questions meet those standards. With respect to scoring, you will learn the process and evidence used to empirically demonstrate the validity, reliability, and fairness of the test. You will also learn how LSAC ensures that scores remain equivalent for every administration, despite fluctuations in test difficulty or test taker proficiency.

How the MBE and Uniform Bar Exam Are Created and Scored

Presented by Mark Albanese (National Conference of Bar Examiners) and Doug Ripkey (National Conference of Bar Examiners)

Ever wonder about what goes into creating the Multistate Bar Exam and the Uniform Bar Exam? This workshop will provide an overview of how these high-stakes licensure exams are developed and scored. Included will be an explanation of the standard-setting procedure.

Best Practices: Fairness

Presented by Mark Raymond (National Board of Medical Examiners) and Ben Theis (LSAC)

Among the fundamental principles of sound test design and practice is that the test be fair to all test takers. This session will review what is required in high-stakes testing to ensure that the instruments themselves, and the resultant test scores, are as fair as possible. Topics will include fairness standards in content review as well as statistical methods used to identify potentially problematic questions. 

2:00 p.m. Workshops (Session 2)

Choose between the following workshops:

Building Formative and Summative Assessments

Presented by Gage Kingsbury (Psychometric Consulting) and Lily Knezevich (LSAC)
Moderated by Kellye Testy (LSAC)

Effective classroom assessments are fundamental to evaluating student progress and growth towards the goals of the course or curriculum. Ideally, formative assessments guide instruction by enabling the professor to adapt instruction to the needs of individual students. This workshop will provide information on creating effective formative and summative assessments and provide an opportunity for the participants to discuss their classroom experiences.

The LSAT: What’s Next?

Presented by Josiah Evans (LSAC) and James Lorié (LSAC)

This session will begin with a summary of the changes on the horizon for the LSAT, including digitization and remote proctoring. This is your opportunity to let the makers of the LSAT know what additional assessments and measures you would like LSAC to provide to assist in admission and your educational mission. 

NCBE Testing Task Force: Bar Exam of the Future

Presented by Susan Davis-Becker (ACS, Testing Task Force consultants)

In this listening session, NCBE’s Testing Task Force will query the audience with the goal of getting stakeholder input on the bar exam. Here is your opportunity to let the makers of the MBE and the UBE know how you would like the bar exam to evolve to meet the current and future needs of the profession. 

Best Practices: Fairness

Presented by Mark Raymond (National Board of Medical Examiners) and Ben Theis (LSAC)

Among the fundamental principles of sound test design and practice is that the test be fair to all test takers. This session will review what is required in high-stakes testing to ensure that the instruments themselves, and the resultant test scores, are as fair as possible. Topics will include fairness standards in content review as well as statistical methods used to identify potentially problematic questions.

 

3:15 p.m. Concluding Remarks