University at Buffalo School of Law, The State University of New York

University at Buffalo School of Law, The State University of New York
309 John Lord O’Brian Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
Phone: 716.645.2907
Email: law-admissions@buffalo.edu | Website: www.law.buffalo.edu

 

Does your law school have a nondiscrimination policy that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation?

Pursuant to University policy, The University at Buffalo is committed to ensuring equal employment, educational opportunity, and equal access to services, programs, and activities without regard to an individual's race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, gender, pregnancy, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, predisposing genetic characteristics, marital status, familial status, veteran status, military status, domestic violence victim status, or ex-offender status. Employees, students, applicants or other members of the University community (including but not limited to vendors, visitors, and guests) may not be subjected to harassment that is prohibited by law or treated adversely based upon a protected characteristic. 

The University’s policy is in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination and harassment. These laws include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as Amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, and the New York State Human Rights Law. These laws prohibit discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment and sexual violence. 

Inquiries regarding the application of Title IX and other laws, regulations and policies prohibiting discrimination may be directed to Sharon Nolan-Weiss, Director of the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Title IX/ ADA Coordinator, 406 Capen Hall, Buffalo, New York 14260; Tel. 716-645-2266; email diversity@buffalo.edu. Inquiries may also be directed to the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, 32 Old Slip 26th Floor, New York, NY 10005-2500; Tel. 646-428-3900; Email OCR.NewYork@ed.gov

Does your law school have a nondiscrimination policy that prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity?

Yes. See above.

Does your law school provide gender-neutral restrooms?

Yes

Does your law school have a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender student organization?

OUTLaw 
OUTLaw promotes a positive atmosphere at the School of Law for LGBT students and their allies. Our primary objective is to educate our colleagues about the legal issues surrounding sexual orientation and gender identity. OUTLaw sponsors activities, panels, social events and service projects that build a network for members and supporters of the LGBT legal community. 

Does your school have any openly lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender faculty members?

Yes

Does your school have any openly lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender administrators?

Yes

Does your law school offer any academic courses primarily focused on lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender legal issues?

  • Law and Sexuality
  • Gender Legal History

Does your law school offer the same benefits to faculty, staff, or student same-sex spouses as they do opposite-sex spouses?

Yes. Health insurance and other benefits flow from the University proper and the various unions at the University. Even broader than same-sex marriage, “domestic partners” of any gender are recognized by the University and are entitled to benefits under their partner’s plans. See the following references:  

http://www.buffalo.edu/administrative-services/for-faculty-staff/benefits/state/uup.html 

http://www.buffalo.edu/administrative-services/forms-catalog/hr/nyship-application-enrolling-domestic-partners-ps4251.html 

Does your law school offer any form of domestic-partner benefits to faculty, staff, or students?

Yes. See above.

Additional Information

The University at Buffalo (UB, university) is committed to ensuring equal employment, educational opportunity, and equal access to services, programs, and activities without regard to an individual's race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, gender, pregnancy, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, predisposing genetic characteristics, marital status, familial status, veteran status, military status, domestic violence victim status, or ex-offender status. This includes, but is not limited to, recruitment, the application process, examination and testing, hiring, training, grading, disciplinary actions, rates of pay or other compensation, advancement, classification, transfer and reassignment, discharge, and all other terms and conditions of employment, educational status, and access to university programs and activities. Employees, students, applicants or other members of the university community (including but not limited to vendors, visitors, and guests) may not be subjected to harassment that is prohibited by law or treated adversely based upon a protected characteristic. 

The university will provide accommodations to ensure the full participation of individuals in university programs, when such accommodations are reasonable and necessary due to an individual's disability, religion, pregnancy, maternity, or breastfeeding status. The university will provide accommodations to individuals with disabilities in accordance with its Reasonable Accommodation Policy. Religious accommodations will be provided in accordance with the university's Religious Accommodation and Expression Policy. 

This policy prohibits retaliation against anyone who files a complaint, participates in an investigation, or opposes a discriminatory act, practice, or policy. Retaliation will not be tolerated and may result in a referral to the university's disciplinary process. 

The University at Buffalo (UB, university) recognizes that students may use a first or middle name other than their legal name to identify themselves. The university will use a student’s preferred name, when possible, in the course of university education and business unless the student’s birth name or legal name is required by law or the preferred name is used for purposes of misidentification, fraud, or misrepresentation. For identity verification purposes, students must use their legal last name.