Stanford University Law School

Stanford University Law School
Office of Admissions, 559 Nathan Abbott Way, Stanford, CA 94305-8610, USA
Phone: 650.723.4985 | Fax: 650.723.0838
Email: admissions@law.stanford.edu | Website: www.law.stanford.edu

Does your law school have a nondiscrimination policy that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation?

Stanford University admits qualified students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, veteran status, or marital status with all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the university. Consistent with the obligations under the law, Stanford prohibits unlawful discrimination, including harassment, on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law in the administration of the university’s programs and activities. Stanford also prohibits unlawful harassment, including sexual harassment and sexual violence. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding this nondiscrimination policy:

Director of the Diversity and Access Office
Mariposa House
585 Capistrano Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-8230

Phone: 650.723.0755
TTY: 650.723.1216
Fax: 650.723.1791

Email: equal.opportunity@stanford.edu

Stanford’s Title IX Coordinator, Cathy Glaze, has been designated to handle inquiries regarding sexual harassment and sexual violence:

Cathy Glaze, Title IX Coordinator
Mariposa House
585 Capistrano Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-8230

Phone: 650.497.4955
Fax: 650.497.9257

Email: titleix@stanford.edu

Does your law school have a nondiscrimination policy that prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity?

Stanford University admits qualified students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, veteran status, or marital status with all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the university. Consistent with the obligations under the law, Stanford prohibits unlawful discrimination, including harassment, on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law in the administration of the university’s programs and activities. Stanford also prohibits unlawful harassment, including sexual harassment and sexual violence. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding this nondiscrimination policy:

Director of the Diversity and Access Office
Mariposa House
585 Capistrano Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-8230

Phone: 650.723.0755
TTY: 650.723.1216
Fax: 650.723.1791

Email: equal.opportunity@stanford.edu

Stanford’s Title IX Coordinator, Cathy Glaze, has been designated to handle inquiries regarding sexual harassment and sexual violence:

Cathy Glaze, Title IX Coordinator
Mariposa House
585 Capistrano Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-8230

Phone: 650.497.4955
Fax: 650.497.9257

Email: titleix@stanford.ed

Does your law school provide gender-neutral restrooms?

Yes

Does your law school have a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender student organization?

Within the SLS community, OutLaw sponsors LGBTQ community-building events, educates our classmates about LGBTQ issues, and works closely with other affinity groups, such as the Black Law Students Association and the Latino Law Students Association, to ensure that the law school remains welcoming for all. In recent years, OutLaw has especially pushed to highlight issues facing trans* people and queer and trans* people of color, and has placed greater emphasis on collaboration with peers in other affinity groups.

OutLaw also helps students network with LGBTQ legal professionals around the country. Over the past few years, SLS has sponsored student participation in Lavender Law, a national conference for LGBTQ law students, judges, and attorneys, and in the Sexual Orientation Law Moot Court Competition, hosted by the Williams Institute. Several current members and alumni have participated in 1L law firm diversity fellowships and maintain connections so that interested OutLaw members can participate in the future.

Finally, our proximity to San Francisco provides our members with the opportunity to work with the most prominent LGBTQ rights organizations in the country, take part in San Francisco’s renowned Pride Week events, connect with other LGBTQ law students and professionals in the Bay Area, or just go out for a night on the town. For all of these reasons, OutLaw is uniquely positioned to foster a great environment for our students.

Does your law school have any openly lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender faculty members?

Stanford is home to many prominent LGBT scholars who serve as active mentors to students.

Does your law school have any openly lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender administrators?

Yes

Does your law school offer any academic courses primarily focused on lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender legal issues?

Law students also have the opportunity to grapple with issues of sexual orientation in a variety of academic classes, including Sexual Orientation and the Law, Gender Law and Public Policy, Family Law, Public Interest Law, Constitutional Law, Poverty Law, and Access to Justice.

For a detailed overview of our course listings and course descriptions, please visit our Course Catalog.

Does your law school offer the same benefits to faculty, staff, or student same-sex spouses as they do opposite-sex spouses?

At Stanford University, a domestic partnership is defined as an established, long-term partnership with an exclusive mutual commitment in which the partners share the necessities of life and ongoing responsibility for their common welfare. Stanford’s nondiscrimination policy makes services that have historically been available to married students available on an equal basis to students with a same-sex or opposite-sex domestic partner.

Does your law school offer any form of domestic-partner benefits to faculty, staff, or students?

At Stanford University, a domestic partnership is defined as an established, long-term partnership with an exclusive mutual commitment in which the partners share the necessities of life and ongoing responsibility for their common welfare. Stanford’s nondiscrimination policy makes services that have historically been available to married students available on an equal basis to students with a same-sex or opposite-sex domestic partner.

Additional Information

Located just 30 miles outside of San Francisco, Stanford law students take advantage of the vast
networking opportunities and vibrant culture of the city, and enjoy a welcoming and close-knit LGBT
community on campus.