Kristin Theis-Álvarez 

Kristin Theis-Álvarez 

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

Kristin Theis-Álvarez is the dean of admissions and financial aid at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law. She graduated with high honors from UC Berkeley, earning her BA in rhetoric and Native American studies. She went on to earn her JD from Stanford University Law School. From 2006 to 2007, Theis-Álvarez worked as coordinator for the Building Young Minds Scholarship Program for Habitat for Humanity East Bay, where she designed and managed a college scholarship program serving low-income high school students. Just prior to her current position, she was the associate director of admissions for outreach and recruitment and then the director of admissions and scholarship programs at Berkeley Law.

Theis-Álvarez began her service to LSAC as a member of the Newcomers Conference Planning Committee and has since served on the Services and Programs Committee, Board of Trustees, and the Summer Workshop Planning Work Group. She also chaired the Services and Programs Committee (2013-2015) and the Annual Meeting and Educational Conference Planning Work Group (2018). She is currently a member of the Board of Trustees and chair of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee. She has presented at the LSAC Annual Meeting multiple times in recent years, as well as at other events such as the University of California FirstGen Conference. Theis-Álvarez serves in several other leadership positions, including as a board member of the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund and on the UC Berkeley Vice Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion’s Native American Advisory Council.

On Election Night 2020, CNN flashed a graphic that showed the results of its latest exit polls for the presidential election. In it, voters were broken into five racial groups: “White,” “Latino,” “Black,” “Asian,” and “Something Else.” The internet immediately went to work. Between viral memes emerged frustration, then anger. In an election where Indigenous voters played a critical role in battleground states like Arizona, the erasure of Native American (and other) voters took on new significance.