LSAT taker beginning the test on a laptop

Frequently Asked Questions about the LSAT

LSAC strives to ensure LSAT® takers have the information and resources they need to succeed on test day. The FAQs below have been compiled based on common questions we receive from test takers and have been divided into subjects to help you find the information you’re looking for.

Additional FAQ collections address specific aspects of the test, such as LSAT Writing®, Testing Accommodations, and LSAT Score Preview.

If you can’t find an answer to your question, please contact our Candidate Services team:

Chat: You can start a conversation with an LSAC customer representative via chat by using the icon at the bottom-right corner of your screen. Our chat feature is available during business hours.

Email: LSACinfo@LSAC.org

Phone: 1.800.336.3982

Hours: Monday-Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET
Saturday and Sunday: 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET
Please note that holiday hours may differ.

Quick Links:

Registering for the LSAT

Testing and Equipment Requirements

Test Format and Test Sections

Preparing for the LSAT

Test and Test-Taker Security

Taking the LSAT

LSAT Scores and Law School Admission

Registering for the LSAT

How do I register for the LSAT?

Registration for all LSAT administrations through June 2024 is now open. Test takers can register for any administration in the 2023-2024 testing year through their LSAC online account opens in new window. For the 2023-2024 testing year, the LSAT fee is $222. You can learn more about upcoming test dates and registration deadlines by visiting Upcoming LSAT Dates.

Register for the LSAT

Starting with the August 2023 LSAT, most test takers will have the choice of whether to take the test at home, proctored by a live, remote proctor, or in person at a Prometric digital testing center. We are adding this option in response to test taker feedback. Our goal is to give test takers the choice of whichever option works best for them.

LSAC is committed to providing necessary testing accommodations for the LSAT and LSAT Writing to candidates with documented disabilities. Your request must be submitted by the accommodation request deadline associated with your test date. Please note that test takers who were previously approved to receive accommodations for the LSAT will automatically receive the same or equivalent accommodations when they register for an upcoming LSAT. More information is available in the LSAC Policy on Accommodations for Test Takers with Disabilities.

Will I be able to choose my testing day and time?

Regardless of whether you choose to test online in a live, remotely proctored format or in person at a test center, you will have the opportunity to choose the day and time that works best for your schedule from the available options.

You can find the date that scheduling opens for each test by clicking the links at Upcoming LSAT Dates. Additionally, LSAT registrants will be notified via email when scheduling opens for their administration.

Test takers who prefer to test at a certain time of day, or who need a specific start time due to other obligations, should schedule their test as early as possible, as slots are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

Scheduling to Test at a Test Center

If you would like to test at a test center, you must schedule your test within 7 days of when scheduling opens. LSAC will notify you when scheduling opens, generally 37 days prior to the administration date. At that time, you will have 7 days to access Prometric’s ProScheduler tool to search for your test center and schedule your in-person test.  

If you’re unable to schedule your test by your administration’s test center scheduling deadline, you can opt to request a test date change (fees will apply) through your LSAC online account, or you can choose to schedule an online, live remotely proctored session. If you do not schedule your test or request a test date change, your test registration will be automatically withdrawn (without a refund).

Scheduling to Test in an Online, Live Remotely Proctored Format

LSAC will notify you via email when scheduling opens, generally 37 days prior to the administration date. At that time, you can access Prometric’s ProScheduler tool to schedule your test.

Please note that scheduling for a remote session will close at 11:59 p.m. ET, 3 days before testing begins. (Select your administration on the Upcoming LSAT Dates page for exact deadlines.) If you’re unable to schedule your test by this deadline, you can opt to request a test date change (fees will apply) through your LSAC online account. Otherwise, your test registration will be automatically withdrawn (without a refund).

Can I change from a test center to remote testing?

Yes, in most cases. If you have scheduled a testing time at a test center and you decide you would rather test remotely, you can go into Prometric’s ProScheduler tool and reschedule your test.

Note that certain accommodations are best administered in a test center modality. If you have been approved for accommodations that require a test center modality, you will not be able to reschedule for a remotely proctored test.

Additionally, international test takers who will use assistive technology to take the LSAT must test in a test center.

Can I change from remote testing to a test center?

You can only change from remote testing to a testing center if the seven-day deadline to schedule for a test center has not passed.

Note that certain accommodations are best administered in a remote modality. If you have been approved for accommodations that require a remote modality, you will not be able to reschedule at a test center.

Can I change the day or time on which I’m testing within the same LSAT administration?

Yes, so long as the scheduling deadline has not yet passed. Scheduling for test centers closes seven days after scheduling opens. Scheduling for remotely proctored tests closes three days before testing begins. Specific deadlines for each administration are available at Upcoming LSAT Dates.

Please note that any changes must be made through the Prometric ProScheduler tool.

Can I be assured that my test date will not interfere with my Sabbath observance?

Yes. The LSAT is administered over several days. Test takers will be able to schedule their exam time for non-Saturday or non-Sunday test dates, in accordance with their religious observance.

I have a fee waiver and need to withdraw my registration. What should I do?

You may withdraw your LSAT registration on the LSAT Status page of your LSAC online account once your administration’s refund request deadline has passed. You must complete your withdrawal by 11:59 p.m. (ET) the night before you are scheduled to test. Once your registration is withdrawn, you may register for another LSAT that is administered within your two-year fee waiver period.

Under what circumstances would I be ineligible to take the LSAT?

  • If you plan to take the LSAT within 24 months of: (a) having either supervised or remotely proctored the LSAT, (b) having been employed or engaged by a third-party LSAT service provider, (c) having been employed or engaged by LSAC to perform obligations that are related to the LSAT, or (d) are a relative of or employed by any individual employed by LSAC, you must notify LSAC prior to registering for the test. Subject to the Intended Use Policy set forth in Section 35 of the Candidate Agreement and to the restrictions listed under Prohibited Behaviors and otherwise in the Agreement, LSAC will review your request for registration and may honor the registration or offer an alternative test location and/or date. Any request must be received by LSAC no later than three (3) days prior to the registration deadline for the applicable LSAT date. Failure to abide by this requirement may result in the initiation of a misconduct and irregularities proceeding.
  • If you do not agree to the terms and conditions of the LSAC Candidate Agreement, you will not be permitted to take the LSAT.
  • Test takers will not be permitted to retake the LSAT if they have already scored a 180 (perfect score) within the current and five past testing years, the period in which LSAC reports scores to law schools.
  • If you have exceeded the LSAT’s test-taking limits, your registration will not be accepted. 

How many times may I take the LSAT?

Starting with the August 2023 test administration, test takers are permitted to take the LSAT:

  • Five times within the current reportable score period (i.e., since June 2018).
  • A total of seven times over a lifetime.

Important Notes

  • Tests taken prior to August 2023 will be counted against these numerical limits (except for the Exceptions listed below).
  • Canceled LSAT scores, including those canceled with the Score Preview option, will be counted against these numerical limits, whereas absences and withdrawals will not.
  • Test takers will not be permitted to retake the LSAT if they have already scored a 180 (perfect score) within the current reportable score period (i.e., since June 2018).

Exceptions to This Policy

  • With the introduction of the LSAT-Flex to provide a safe and effective mechanism for candidates to earn scores during the COVID-19 emergency, LSAC made the decision that the May, June, July, and August 2020 LSAT-Flex tests do not count toward these limits.
  • Tests taken prior to September 2019 do not count toward these limits.

Test takers who have special circumstances and want to request an exception to this policy may submit an appeal.

By accepting the Candidate Agreement, what am I authorizing LSAC and law schools to do?

Accepting the Candidate Agreement means that you are giving LSAC permission to release information from your file — including, but not limited to, the information contained on the Candidate Agreement form, your LSAT score, and information regarding any alleged misconduct or irregularities in the admission process. You are also giving the law schools to which you apply permission to release information to LSAC.

What else am I agreeing to by accepting the Candidate Agreement?

By accepting the Candidate Agreement, you are certifying that you are the test taker whose name appears on the registration, and that you plan to take the LSAT for the sole purpose of being considered for admission to law school. You are further certifying that all the information on the form, as well as other information and materials submitted to LSAC for your file, are complete and accurate.

How do I make changes to my profile information (e.g., preferred/chosen name, legal name, date of birth) after I have registered for the LSAT?

JD candidates can make updates to their profile information, including first name (legal and preferred/chosen), last name, date of birth, and Social Security/Insurance number, through their LSAC online account opens in new window. Visit the “Profile” page included in the “My Account” menu to make changes. You may be required to upload documentation to support certain biographical information changes, such as Social Security/Insurance number, date of birth, and legal first and last name. For more information, please visit Biographical Information Changes.

This is important. To be permitted to take the LSAT, the first and last name listed on your ID must exactly match the legal first and last name listed in your LSAC online account.

Testing and Equipment Requirements

What kind of equipment do I need in order to take the LSAT remotely?

To take the LSAT remotely, you’ll need:

  • A quiet, well-lit, private, enclosed room in which to take the test with a table or desk and a chair. Please note that transparent glass walls are not considered part of a private room and are prohibited.
  • A laptop or desktop computer with one of the following active and licensed operating systems: Windows 8.1, MacOS 10.13 to 12.6.5, or MacOS Ventura 13.3.1 and above.
  • A screen resolution of 1024x768.
  • A webcam with a resolution of 640x480p and a microphone.
  • A strong and stable Internet connection with a download speed of at least 1.0 mbps.
  • The latest version of Google Chrome web browser.
  • Administrative rights to the computer on which you’ll take the test. (This is so you can download the required proctoring software.)

Run a System Readiness Check at Prometric opens in new window

We encourage you to test your machine using Prometric’s convenient tool before scheduling opens, and to familiarize yourself with the test’s user interface by trying our free practice tests and tutorials on LawHub®. This will ensure that you know how to eliminate and select responses.

What kind of equipment do I need in order to take the LSAT at a test center?

All equipment and materials, including scratch paper and pencils, will be provided by Prometric to all test takers who choose to test at a testing center.

What if I don’t have all the equipment that I need, or a quiet and private room with a strong, stable internet connection to take the LSAT remotely?

LSAC understands that some candidates may not have access to a quiet or private room in which to take a remotely proctored test. Candidates may now request to test in person at a designated testing center.

Test Format and Test Sections

What is the LSAT like?

Starting with the August 2023 administration, the LSAT will be delivered in both an online, live remote-proctored format and in person at a professional testing center

The test will have three scored sections — one section each of Reading Comprehension, Analytical Reasoning, and Logical Reasoning — and a  fourth, unscored variable section that will allow us to validate new test questions for future use.

 The LSAT will include a 10-minute intermission between the second and third sections. During the intermission, you can leave your testing area to have a snack or use the restroom. Possession of electronic devices, such as cell phones, is prohibited during the intermission and will result in termination of your test. You will need to check in with your proctor before you can resume testing. 

This is important. If you do not complete the recheck-in process with your proctor after the intermission is over, your test session will be terminated, and you will need to register for a new LSAT administration. You will not receive a refund.

Test takers who do not have a previous writing sample on file must also take LSAT Writing, a proctored, on-demand writing exam that is administered online using secure proctoring software that is installed on the candidate’s own computer. Test takers will complete LSAT Writing separately from the multiple-choice portion of the test, at a convenient time and place of their choosing. LSAT Writing becomes available in candidates’ online accounts eight days prior to their test administration.

How long is the LSAT?

The LSAT is composed of four 35-minute test sections. There is a 10-minute intermission between the second and third sections. The test takes approximately 3 hours for standard test takers.

In what order will I see the LSAT sections?

Test sections (Analytical Reasoning, Logical Reasoning, Reading Comprehension, and the unscored variable section) may be presented in any order during your actual LSAT exam, even though the sections in LawHub’s LSAT sample tests are always presented in the same order.

Please note that the unscored variable section will be one of the three standard section types — either Analytical Reasoning, Logical Reasoning, or Reading Comprehension. The content of the unscored variable section will differ depending on your test form.

Is there a break during the test?

Yes, both the online, remotely proctored and in-person modalities of the LSAT include a 10-minute intermission between the second and third sections. During the 10-minute intermission, you can leave your testing area to have a snack or use the restroom. You must notify your proctor at the start of the intermission, before you leave the view of the camera.

You may not possess an electronic device, such as a cell phone during the intermission.

After the intermission, you will need to complete a recheck-in process with your proctor before you can resume testing. 

This is important. 

  • If you do not complete the recheck-in process after the break is over, your test session will be terminated, and you will need to register for a new LSAT administration. You will not receive a refund.
  • Working on test material, including scratch paper, during the intermission or while taking an unscheduled break to use the restroom, is strictly prohibited.

Unscheduled Restroom Breaks

If you need to take an unscheduled break to use the restroom at any other point during the test, you must notify your proctor prior to leaving your testing area.

Additional Breaks for Accommodated Test Takers

LSAC understands that accommodated test takers often have a longer testing appointment and therefore may need additional breaks between sections of the test. Therefore, any test taker who has been approved for 100% additional time (or more) will be granted five-minute breaks between the other test sections upon request (i.e., after sections 1 and 3; in addition to the standard 10-minute intermission after section 2). Requests for these additional 5-minute breaks must be made by the published accommodation request deadline. Test takers can use these breaks to use the restroom even if the need for a restroom break is unrelated to the test taker’s disability.

In addition, breaks between test sections and stop/start breaks are available as accommodations on the LSAT, and can also be used for the purposes of using the restroom. Please take this into consideration when requesting testing accommodations.

Preparing for the LSAT

How can I prepare for the LSAT?

Both the online, live remote-proctored and in-person modalities of the LSAT are administered through LSAC LawHub®. To familiarize yourself with the content and interface of the LSAT, we recommend using the free Official LSAT PrepTests® and tutorial videos available through LawHub. Using these practice tests, you’ll be able to do everything you can do during the actual exam — eliminating and selecting responses, highlighting passages, setting screen preferences, and more.

If you’re taking the LSAT remotely, we encourage you to learn more about the technical requirements opens in new window of the live, online remote-proctored and to test your equipment as soon as possible using Prometric’s System Readiness Check opens in new window.

Test and Test-Taker Security

How does LSAC ensure the test is secure?

We know that the security, integrity, and validity of the LSAT are important to candidates and schools, so we take many steps to ensure the security of the LSAT.

All remote LSAT takers are monitored by live remote proctors via the camera and microphone in the test takers’ computers. The video and audio feeds are recorded in case further review is necessary.

Test takers who choose the in-person test center option will be monitored by on-site personnel.

Can Prometric get personal information from my computer?

No, Prometric cannot access your computer files without your knowledge

What information about my LSAT experience am I allowed to share with others?

You may share general information, such as how you felt about the test-taking experience, the exam overall, or a section of the test. Sharing more details, such as information about a particular passage or a particular question and how you answered it, is prohibited.

Can I discuss details about the test, such as in a casual conversation?

No. The Candidate Agreement clearly states that sharing test details orally, in writing, on the internet, or through any other means or media is prohibited. This rule is necessary to ensure that the test remains fair for all test takers.

What is the penalty for sharing test details?

LSAC retains complete ownership rights to the LSAT and reserves the right to pursue all suitable courses of action to prevent fraudulent or unauthorized uses of its intellectual property and to prevent the compromise of secure test materials.

Taking the LSAT

What am I allowed to have with me during the LSAT?

Generally, your desktop must be clear of anything not test-related. The list of items permitted during the LSAT without prior approval from LSAC can be found in the LSAC Candidate Agreement. Section 14 covers items that are permitted at test centers, while Section 15 covers items that are permitted while testing remotely.

You are also permitted to bring any of the Preapproved Items opens in new window listed on the Prometric website.

Please note that if you’re taking the test at a test center, a locker will be provided to you to safely store any items, other than those listed above, while you take your LSAT.

Can I have a beverage on my desk while I test?

Remote test takers are permitted to have a beverage in a clear/transparent container.

Candidates testing in a center are permitted to have water only, in a clear/transparent container with a lid or cap.

Note that all labels must be removed, and the container is subject to inspection.

What kind of identification do I need to take the LSAT?

Every candidate is required to present a physical, valid international passport or a physical, valid government-issued photo ID issued by the United States of America, U.S. Territories, or Canada. The ID must be current (or have expired within 3 months of your test date) and must contain:

  • A recent and recognizable photo of you
  • Your first name
  • Your last name
  • Your date of birth

The first and last name listed on your ID must exactly match the legal first and last name associated with your LSAC account. You can make changes to your legal name on the “Profile” page in your account. For more information, please visit Biographical Information Changes

Please note that, by law, U.S. military IDs cannot be photographed and thus cannot be used for this purpose.

Learn more about ID accepted for LSAT admission

What if I don’t have my physical ID? Can I use a picture of it?

No. LSAC will only accept physical identification, regardless of whether you’re testing remotely or at a test center. Digital images, photocopies, etc., are not acceptable under any circumstances.

What behaviors are prohibited?

Adhering to the highest moral and ethical standards is essential for those in the legal profession. Every test taker is required to sign a Candidate Agreement each time they take the LSAT. Please make sure you read the entire Agreement; rushing through it or ignoring any of it could have serious adverse consequences.

Generally, during the test you may not:

  • Communicate with anyone other than your proctor
  • Read aloud
  • Allow your face to leave the webcam’s view (remote test takers)
  • Leave your seat
  • Run any prohibited software applications
  • Access any prohibited materials
  • Connect or disconnect any external storage devices
  • Behave in a noncompliant or abusive manner
  • Disable your camera or audio capabilities

After the test you may not:

  • Share details of the test in an oral or written form, which includes sharing content on the internet or through any means or media
  • Copy, save, duplicate, or distribute any test material on your computer or any written notes you may have used during the test

The proctor’s instructions must be followed at all times. Any suspicious behavior noted by the proctor will be grounds for immediately ending the testing session. Terminated sessions are subject to score cancellation polices and to LSAC investigations that could lead to a finding of misconduct or irregularity. Any such finding may be shared with the law schools to which you apply.

What electronic devices are prohibited?

For remote test takers, one cell phone is allowed to be in your testing room, but it must be powered down and placed out of reach for the duration of the test.

In-person test takers will need to leave their powered-down cell phone in the locker assigned to them.

Additional cell phones are prohibited. You may not access the cell phone during the 10-minute intermission. Unauthorized access of an electronic device, such as a cell phone or tablet, will cause your testing session to be terminated (without a refund).

Devices that cannot be in the room during the LSAT include timers of any kind, watches of any kind, electronic cigarettes, fitness-tracking devices, beepers, pagers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), calculators, cameras, recording devices, listening devices (including, but not limited to, headphones, ear buds, air pods, and other electronic listening devices and/or noise-canceling devices other than generic foam ear plugs), headsets, and iPods and other media players. Please note that tablets, laptops, personal computers, or any other electronic device not being used to take the test are prohibited.

Prohibited electronic devices may not be in the room during the test because they cannot be monitored via your webcam feed. Please be aware that your proctor will not allow you to test if any prohibited electronics are noted during the room scan portion of your check-in. This includes any monitors or desktop computers that happen to be on the desk you may be resting your laptop on during the test. If your session is flagged for a violation during the test, your audio and video data may be referred to for an investigation by the Misconduct and Irregularities Subcommittee.

More information can be found at Misconduct & Irregularities and in the LSAC Candidate Agreement.

What other items are prohibited?

Test takers may not access briefcases, handbags, or backpacks of any kind. Head coverings of any kind (e.g., hats, hoods, bonnets, durags, scarves, etc.) may not be worn, unless the head covering is a religious requirement. Sunglasses or other eyewear with tinted lenses may not be worn. Books, printed materials, and any notes written before the start of the test may not be used, accessed, or referenced at any point during your session.

Other non-electronic prohibited items can remain in the room, but they must be put away and not accessed or referenced during the test.

What if I need headphones, earplugs, or earbuds to take the test?

Remote LSAT takers may use soft, non-electronic, non-corded/banded, generic foam ear plugs, which will need to be shown to and approved by your LSAT proctor. In-person LSAT takers will be assigned noise-reducing headphones as part of their equipment and materials.

This is important. Please ensure that your ear plugs will not interfere with your ability to receive instruction from your proctor. Test takers are responsible for adhering to proctor instructions and communications at all times.

In addition, unless a specified accommodation has been granted, remote test takers cannot wear headphones, earbuds, or anything similar that is not a soft, non-electronic, non-corded/banded, generic foam ear plug. These types of items are unable to be monitored by proctors to ensure a fair and equal testing environment. In-person test takers can only use the headphones assigned to them at the start of their test. LSAC’s goal is to safeguard your test and score by putting this policy in place to mitigate testing irregularities that could result in the termination of your session or cancellation of your score.

If I’m testing at a center, what kind of scratch paper am I provided?

Candidates who test in a center will be provided three (3) blank, unlined, colored scratch paper booklets. Each booklet contains two pages. You will also be provided two (2) pencils.

Candidates who test in a center are NOT permitted to bring their own scratch paper or writing instruments.

If I’m testing remotely, am I allowed to use scratch paper?

Yes, remote test takers are permitted to have six (6) blank sheets of 8.5”x11” scratch paper. The paper may be lined, unlined, or graphed. For more information, please review Section 15 of the LSAC Candidate Agreement.

Please note that scratch paper is not allowed for taking LSAT Writing.

Can I use assistive technology programs while I take the LSAT?

The LSAT test-delivery software includes several built-in, user-adjustable tools, including a feature to increase text size incrementally and a line-spacing function. We encourage you to familiarize yourself with the built-in features of the computer-based LSAT by utilizing the free Official LSAT Prep® practice tests available through LSAC LawHub.

Upon request, all LSAT takers (with or without test accommodations) are also permitted to use assistive technology programs to make web content accessible, such as keyboard-controlled screen reading software, screen magnification programs, or speech recognition software. To protect the security of test content, selectable text functionality (i.e., the ability to select text or place the cursor on the screen) is not available on any of LSAC’s products. Therefore, the computer-based LSAT is accessible with screen reader software programs that can be controlled and navigated using keystrokes and keyboard commands rather than text-to-speech software controlled and navigated using a mouse and cursor.

If you plan to use assistive technology programs during the LSAT, you must inform LSAC during registration and complete the Assistive Technology Form. This advance notice is required so that we can ensure you’ll have access to the software within the proctored environment. (The following programs are available upon request in our test centers: JAWS 2021 screen reader, ZoomText 2019 magnification, and Dragon Pro 15 speech recognition software. For remote testing, you will need to provide your own assistive technology programs. International test takers can only use assistive technology programs within our test centers.)

Contact LSAC for Questions and Support

If you have any questions about the accessibility of LSAC’s products, please contact accessibility@LSAC.org.

If you require additional accommodation to access the LSAT due to a disability, we encourage you to contact an LSAC Disability Customer Service Representative at accom@LSAC.org or 215.966.6625 (toll-free: 855.384.2253) for assistance. Any request for testing accommodations must be submitted by the applicable registration deadline. LSAC is committed to working with candidates to facilitate accessibility to the LSAT.

If testing remotely, where should I take the test?

Choose a quiet, well-lit, and private work area within a fully enclosed room with no transparent/glass walls or doors, where you can complete the test without interruption. A hard work surface, such as a desk or table, and a chair are required. It is very important to have a strong, stable internet connection to have a successful remote-testing experience. Ensure that your workspace is clean and clear of all prohibited items. Your entire face must be clearly visible throughout the test. Once you begin testing, do not move out of view of the webcam or change working environments until the test is over.

What should I wear during my remote testing session?

Your testing session will be proctored live, and video of your session will later be reviewed by LSAC personnel. Please dress as you would if you were taking the test in person at a physical testing center. Please note that lighter clothing items such as sweaters, suit jackets, scarves, etc., should be hung on the back of your chair if removed. Outerwear such as heavy coats, parkas, etc., and items that can obscure your face from the proctor’s view, such as head coverings (with the exception of religious apparel), sunglasses, and headphones, may not be worn.

When can I eat during the LSAT?

Test takers are only permitted to access food during an authorized break such as the 10-minute intermission. No food is permitted on the desktop during the administration of the test, unless you have an approved disability-related testing accommodation. If you are testing in a center, you will be required to store any food in the locker that is assigned to you unless you have an approved accommodation to keep food at your workstation.

Will I be able to take breaks during the test?

Yes, both the online, live remote-proctored and in-person modalities of the LSAT include a 10-minute intermission between the second and third sections. During the 10-minute intermission, you can leave your testing area to have a snack or use the restroom. Should you need to use the restroom at any other time during the test, you must notify your proctor and wait for permission. You may not possess a cell phone during the intermission or any unscheduled break. You will need to check in with your proctor before you can resume testing. 

This is important. If you do not complete the recheck-in process after the break is over, your test session may be terminated, and you will need to register for a new LSAT administration. You will not receive a refund.

Additional Breaks for Accommodated Test Takers

LSAC understands that accommodated test takers often have a longer testing appointment and therefore may need additional breaks between sections of the test. Therefore, any test taker who has been approved for 100% additional time (or more) will be granted five-minute breaks between the other test sections upon request (i.e., after sections 1 and 3; in addition to the standard 10-minute intermission after section 2). Requests for these additional 5-minute breaks must be made by the published accommodation request deadline. Test takers can use these breaks to use the restroom even if the need for a restroom break is unrelated to the test taker’s disability. Candidates can still request other break(s) as accommodations on the LSAT and are not limited to five-minute breaks between sections.

In addition, breaks between test sections and stop/start breaks are available as accommodations on the LSAT, and can also be used for the purposes of using the restroom. Please take this into consideration when requesting testing accommodations.

If I’m testing remotely, what happens if I lose my internet connection, or have other technical difficulties?

In most cases, the remote proctoring system will save your progress and pause the test while the technical issue is resolved. Once the issue is resolved and you restart the test, the system will allow you to resume where you left off.

If your connection is interrupted during the test, you will be required to complete the security check-in process again before resuming. The proctor will exercise discretion in determining whether to allow you to resume your testing session more than once should you continue to experience connectivity issues. If you are unable to restore your connection during your scheduled testing window, your testing session will be terminated, and you will be moved to a future registration date.

What if someone else enters the room while I am taking the test?

If someone else enters the room, you must ask them to leave immediately. At the proctor’s discretion, you may continue testing once the person leaves the room. Your testing session will be flagged for further review. You will not be penalized if the interaction is brief and it is evident that no information about the test was communicated.

What if my pet enters the room while I’m taking the test?

If a pet wanders into the room while you’re testing, you may continue to test. Your face must be clearly visible throughout the test, and once you begin, you cannot move out of view of the webcam until the test is over.

Do I need to take LSAT Writing? When can I do that, and how?

Yes, LSAT Writing is required and is included with your test registration fee. If you do not already have a completed writing sample on file, you must complete LSAT Writing before your score can be released. To help meet this requirement, LSAT Writing now becomes available in test takers’ LSAC online accounts eight days prior to each test administration.

We strongly recommend you complete LSAT Writing at the earliest possible time so that your score can be released on time.

LSAT Scores and Law School Admission

When will I get my LSAT score?

You can find score release dates for each upcoming test administration at Upcoming LSAT Dates. Your score will be released on the date listed so long as you have an approved LSAT Writing sample on file and there are no holds on your account.

If you are a first-time test taker, you must complete LSAT Writing, and have it approved, before your score can be released. To help meet this requirement, LSAT Writing is available in test takers’ LSAC accounts eight days prior to each test administration. Your writing sample must be processed before it can be added to your LSAC file. Please note that processing can take up to three weeks from the date you complete LSAT Writing, depending on volume and any flagged issues. We strongly recommend you complete LSAT Writing as early as possible so that your score can be released on time.

Will I be able to complete my LSAT Writing at a test center?

No. You can only complete the multiple-choice part of the LSAT at a test center. LSAT Writing will remain in an on-demand, remotely proctored format available 24/7, 365 days a year.

How will my scores be reported?

Scores are released to test takers at 9 a.m. ET via the test taker’s LSAC online account. Your score will only be released if you have an approved LSAT Writing sample on file and there are no holds on your account. If you are a first-time test taker, you must complete LSAT Writing before your score can be released.

Your score will be released to the schools to which you have applied at the same time it is released to you, unless you have purchased the LSAT Score Preview option. If you purchased Score Preview, your score will be released to law schools only after you have chosen to have it released, or at the end of the Score Preview period if you have not canceled the score.

Can I cancel my LSAT score before scores are released?

Yes. Should you decide to cancel your LSAT score, you must do so within six (6) calendar days of your test date. You can cancel your score through your LSAC online account or by contacting LSAC directly at LSACinfo@LSAC.org or 1.800.336.3982. Please note that this six-day deadline does not apply for test takers who have signed up for LSAT Score Preview.

How do I sign up for LSAT Score Preview?

LSAT Score Preview is available to test takers who wish to see their score before deciding whether to keep it as part of their LSAC transcript and report it to schools. Score Preview will cost $45 if you purchase it prior to the first day of testing for a given test administration, or $75 if you purchase it after testing has concluded.

Test takers who purchase Score Preview will receive their scores at the same time as other test takers (assuming they have an approved LSAT Writing sample on file and have no holds on their accounts), and will have six (6) calendar days from the date their score is released to decide if they want to cancel or keep their score. If they take no action, their scores will be added to their LSAC transcript and released to schools at the end of the six-day period.

Score Preview is available for purchase through your LSAC online account.

How long should I keep records?

Because some state bar associations inquire about the law school admission records of those seeking admission to the bar, you should maintain complete copies of all law school application records throughout the admission cycle and your law school career.

Any LSAT scores you have earned after June 2018 are available to view and print from within your LSAC online account. For a copy of scores received prior to June 2018, you can contact LSAC to order an Official Candidate LSAT Score Report.

How can I inquire about a test question?

If, while taking the LSAT, you find what you believe to be an error or ambiguity in a test question that affects your response to the question, report it to the test proctor as soon as you finish the test and email LSATTS@LSAC.org immediately.

LSAC will respond to all reasonable inquiries about test questions, but to be entitled to the formal review process described in the LSAC Policies and Procedures Governing Challenges to LSAT Questions, your inquiry must be made within 90 days of your LSAT score being released and must include the reasons why you believe there is an error or ambiguity. Your inquiry should include your name, your LSAC account number, question type (Analytical Reasoning, Logical Reasoning, or Reading Comprehension), and any identifying information you can recall such as the section in which the question appeared, the number of the question, or key words in the question. LSAT Test Developers will review your inquiry and send a written response. If the response does not answer your concerns, you can request further review by a panel of expert reviewers not otherwise associated with LSAC.

How will schools use my LSAT score?

Law schools use LSAT scores as one component of a holistic admission process that considers many factors related to each candidate. LSAC conducts research for individual schools on how LSAT scores and other applicant credentials correlate to student performance at their school. These schools have a long history of using the LSAT and know how to use the test and other predictors in their processes.

Are there other tests available for law school admission?

Some law schools in the U.S. and Canada accept other tests. However, the LSAT is the only test accepted by all law schools, and the only test designed specifically for law school admission. Other tests are designed for different purposes and test different skills. The best way to assess your ability to succeed in law school is to take the LSAT.

What effect does the LSAT have on law school diversity?

Properly used as part of well-developed holistic review admission practices, law schools can effectively consider many distinct applicant qualities and life experiences when advancing their mission-related DEI goals. The LSAT enables schools to identify highly qualified candidates who might otherwise be overlooked on the basis of undergraduate institution, GPA, lack of access to extracurricular activities, or other factors.

How does LSAC ensure the LSAT is measuring the right skills?

LSAC periodically conducts skills analysis studies to ensure the LSAT is focused on the right skills. Law school faculty who participate in these studies consistently rate all of the skills assessed by the LSAT as those most essential to success in law school and legal practice. LSAC also uses reports from the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) and the American Bar Association (ABA), along with focus groups of students and law school faculty, to ensure the LSAT assesses the most relevant skills.

How does LSAC ensure that the test is fair?

Every LSAT question is subjected to rigorous external expert review and field testing to ensure it is free from any form of bias and fair to every group of test takers; any question that shows any racial, ethnic, or gender bias in field testing is rejected and never used in actual scored testing. Additionally, LSAC believes standardized assessments should be only one important component in a holistic admission process. Properly used as part of well-developed holistic review admission practices, law schools can effectively consider many distinct applicant qualities and life experiences when advancing their mission-related DEI goals. In this context, the LSAT provides a way for every student to demonstrate their skills, regardless of what undergraduate institution they attended or other forms of privilege they may have experienced.

calendar icon

Registration for the April 2024 LSAT administration is now open.

Register today

Explore This Section