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Retaking the LSAT

Reasons why some people consider retaking the LSAT

The LSAT assesses skills needed for success during the first year of law school. So, if you’ve taken the LSAT once, or even more than once, and don’t believe your score accurately reflects your skills, you may be considering whether to retest. While retaking the LSAT is not for everyone, some individuals choose to retest because of a variety of factors. Here are some of the considerations we hear from test takers:

Frequently Asked Questions About Retaking the LSAT

How many times may I take the LSAT?

  • Five times within the current reportable score period (i.e., since June 2018).
  • A total of seven times over a lifetime.

For complete details, and to learn how to request an appeal, please visit Limits on Repeating the Test.

How likely is my LSAT score to improve if I retake the LSAT?

Many test takers increase their score on the second test. However, some test takers’ scores do not change, and some even experience a score decrease. Analyses indicate that, on average, test takers taking their second test in the same testing year increase their scores 2 to 3 points.

As a part of LawHub’s LSAT Official Test Prep Library opens in new window, LSAC provides full free PrepTests as well as practice drills, videos and articles that can guide you through your preparation. For even more prep, you can access an extensive library of full Official LSAT PrepTests® with a LawHub Advantage subscription opens in new window.

If you would like to retake the LSAT but are concerned that your score might drop, consider purchasing LSAT Score Preview. This option will give you six days to decide whether to keep or cancel your score after it’s been released to you. If you decide to cancel your score, it will not be added to your LSAC file and will not be released to law schools. (Exact deadlines are available at LSAT Dates, Deadlines, and Score Release Dates.) Score Preview is available to all LSAT takers, regardless of how many times you’ve taken the test.

I did not study for my first LSAT administration. How should I prepare for a retake?

Like any assessment, you will do your best work on the LSAT if you are comfortable with the format and timing of the exam and familiar with the questions you will encounter in each section. There are many ways to prepare, including free online resources or paid test prep courses, so choose the approach that works best for you.

LSAC provides four full free PrepTests, or access to an extensive library of full Official LSAT PrepTests® through LSAC’s LawHub Advantage Subscriptionopens in new window.

Is a retake included with my approved LSAC fee waiver?

It depends. If you were approved for a Tier 1 waiver, your fee waiver covers up to two LSATs taken within the two-year fee waiver period. If you were approved for a Tier 2 waiver, your fee waiver does not include a retake.

For more information, visit Fee Waivers for LSAC Programs and Services.

How do law schools’ admission committees consider multiple LSAT scores?

When you apply to a law school, the admission committee receives a copy of all your reportable LSAT scores. This includes all valid scores earned during the current testing year and the previous five testing years. (For more information, please review LSAT Scoring.) LSAC advises law schools that a candidate’s average LSAT score is the best predictor of their ability. However, some schools place more weight on a candidate’s highest score. Each school has its own approach to the admission process, so you should contact the schools you are interested in directly.

If I’m satisfied with my score, what should I do next?

Many candidates choose to apply to law school after taking the LSAT just one time. You may find LSAC’s UGPA/LSAT Search Tool useful as you narrow down potential schools. Our tool will give you some information about UGPA and LSAT ranges that typify admitted students, but law schools take into consideration additional factors to assess the whole candidate. We encourage you to contact the law schools in which you’re interested to best understand the factors that each school considers.

You can get started on your applications through your LSAC account.

Get started on your law school applications

LSAT Resources and Support

Prepare for test day success!

Regardless of the reason, a decision to retest should involve a commitment to reset. Different outcomes require a different approach. We strongly recommend that you alter, enhance, or expand your path to preparation. LSAC offers many tools to support that preparation journey.

Learn more about our authentic LSAT test prep, including practice tests on LawHub.

If you’re satisfied with your score, take the next step…

Many candidates choose to apply to law school after taking the LSAT just one time. You may find LSAC’s UGPA/LSAT Search Tool useful as you narrow down potential schools. Our tool will give you some information about UGPA and LSAT ranges that typify admitted students, but law schools take into consideration additional factors to assess the whole candidate. We encourage you to contact the law schools in which you’re interested to best understand the factors that each school considers. 

You can get started on your applications through your LSAC account.

Get started on your law school applications

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