Tulane University Law School

The information on this page was provided by the law school.

Official Guide to ABA-Approved JD Programs


Introduction

The opportunity to attend law school in New Orleans, perhaps the most dynamic city in the United States today, can transform an ordinary law school experience into an extraordinary one. Tulane Law School, established in 1847, is among the oldest law schools in the United States. The Law School is located on the main university campus in uptown New Orleans, in a picturesque neighborhood of residences, both large and small, as well as restaurants, bookstores, and other commercial establishments.

New Orleans

New Orleans offers extensive legal resources, including the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, US District Court, the Louisiana Supreme Court, and all of the lower state civil, criminal, and specialized courts. Within the legal community, students have the opportunity to work with both prosecutors and public defenders, in the private sector, the public sector, and in the public interest. Life outside of the law is rich, too. New Orleans is justly renowned for its music and its food. In addition to numerous events at Tulane University, students enjoy the advantages of city life and the richness of New Orleans culture. Concerts, festivals, and innumerable citywide events take place throughout the year.

Facilities

The Law School is housed in the 160,000-square-foot John Giffen Weinmann Hall. Designed to integrate classrooms, other student spaces, faculty offices, and a library containing both national and international collections, the building is centrally located on Tulane University’s campus. Immediately adjacent to Weinmann Hall is the Law School’s Career Development Office. Within minutes of the Law School building are the university’s Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, housing over one million volumes; the Lavin-Bernick Center for Student Life; university dining facilities; the university bookstore; the Reily Student Recreation Center; the Freeman School of Business; the Newcomb Art Gallery; and various auditoriums and performance venues.

The Academic Program

The Law School curriculum offers a full range of common law and federal subjects. In addition, Tulane offers electives in civil law, with the result that students have the opportunity to pursue comparative education in the world’s two major legal systems. The breadth and depth of the curriculum permit students to survey a broad range of subject areas or to concentrate in one or more. The background, enthusiasm, and scholarship of the internationally known faculty further enrich the educational experience.

Six semesters in residence, completion of 88 credits with at least a C average, fulfillment of an upper-level writing requirement, and a 50-hour pro bono obligation are required for graduation from the JD degree program. The first-year curriculum comprises eight required courses, including Legal Research and Writing.

After the first year, all courses are elective, except for the required Legal Profession course. All first-year and many upper-level courses are taught in multiple sections to allow for smaller classes. The upper-level curriculum includes introductory as well as advanced courses in a broad range of subject areas, including international and comparative law, business and corporate law, environmental law, maritime law, criminal law, intellectual property, taxation, and litigation and procedure, among others.

At the graduate level, the Law School offers a general LLM program and an SJD program, as well as specialized LLM programs in Admiralty, Energy and Environmental Law, American Law, and International and Comparative Law.

Special Programs

The school offers optional concentration programs that allow JD students to receive one certificate of completion of successful studies in

  1. European Legal Studies,
  2. Environmental Law,
  3. Maritime Law,
  4. Sports Law,
  5. Civil Law, or
  6. International and Comparative Law.

Tulane’s Eason-Weinmann Center for Comparative Law, the Payson Center for International Development, the Maritime Law Center, the Energy Law Center, and the Institute for Water Law and Policy add depth to the curriculum and interesting opportunities for students. Tulane also offers strong curricula in intellectual property law and constitutional law, as well as business, corporate, and commercial law.

Tulane conducts an annual summer school in New Orleans and offers summer-study programs abroad. Programs have been held in England, the Netherlands, Italy, Germany, Greece, and Brazil. Semester-long exchange programs with select law schools in countries such as Argentina, Australia, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain are also offered.

The school was the first in the country to require that each student complete pro bono work prior to graduation.

Clinical and Skills Programs

The school offers live-client clinical programs in civil litigation, criminal defense, juvenile litigation, domestic violence, environmental law, and legislative and administrative advocacy. In addition, there is a trial advocacy course and a negotiation and mediation advocacy course. Third-year students may participate in year-long externships with federal and state judges, with a variety of public interest organizations, or with certain government agencies. Students may receive credit for summer externships throughout the world. A week-long intersession “boot camp” is offered each January, with separate tracks for civil litigation, criminal pretrial, and transactional practice.

Joint-Degree Programs

Joint-degree programs are offered in conjunction with Tulane’s Freeman School of Business (JD/MBA and JD/MACCT), School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (JD/MHA and JD/MPH), and School of Social Work (JD/MSW). The JD/MA in Latin American Studies is offered in cooperation with the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Proposals for programs in cooperation with other Tulane academic departments are considered on an ad hoc basis.

Admission and Financial Aid

Our admission process is based on a complete review of all of the information in each candidate’s file. This naturally includes the LSAT score and the undergraduate academic record. In the case of multiple LSAT scores, the school sees all scores but will give more weight to the highest score based on the candidate’s explanation. Tulane looks closely at subjective factors such as grade trends, courseload, undergraduate school, nonacademic activities, the student’s background and experience, barriers overcome, the personal statement, and optional letters of recommendation or evaluations. The Law School processes applications for admission beginning September 1 and announces decisions beginning December 1. All candidates receive consideration for merit-based scholarship awards. Need-based and credit-based loans require submission of the FAFSA. A loan repayment assistance program is available to graduates working full time in eligible public interest employment.

Student Life

Journals published or edited at Tulane Law School include the Tulane Law Review, Tulane Maritime Law Journal, Tulane Environmental Law Journal, Law and Sexuality, Tulane European and Civil Law Forum, Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, Tulane Journal of Technology and Intellectual Property, and Sports Lawyers Journal. An active moot court program holds trial and appellate competitions within the school and fields teams for a variety of interschool competitions, including alternative dispute resolution methods. The Law School has a chapter of the Order of the Coif.

The Student Bar Association functions as the student government and recommends students for appointment to faculty committees. Over 40 student organizations exist at Tulane, including the International Law Society, Black Law Students Association, La Alianza del Derecho, Asian-Pacific-American Law Students Association, Business Law Society, and Sports Law Society, among others. The Tulane Public Interest Law Foundation raises funds, matched by the Law School, to support as many as 30 students each summer in public interest fellowships with a variety of organizations. The Environmental Law Society hosts a major “science and the public interest” conference each spring.

Most students live in a variety of off-campus neighborhoods throughout the New Orleans metropolitan area, often within walking or biking distance of the Law School.

Career Services

The Law School Career Development Office assists both students and alumni in their job searches. Each student is assigned a career counselor as a first-year student and thereafter has access to a full range of career counseling services from the entire staff as well as to programs on job-search skills and practice areas. A large career services library is available, including extensive online resources. Tulane organizes both on- and off-campus interview programs for its students. Career development staff members also engage in employer outreach activities on a national basis. The office takes a proactive stance in assisting students with their job searches, with the result that Tulane graduates find law-related employment throughout the United States.

Admitted Applicant Profile

25-75% UGPA Range at Tulane:

3.25 to 3.70

2.00
2.58
3.16
3.74
4.33

25-75% LSAT Score Range at Tulane:

155 to 161

120
135
150
165
180

25-75% UGPA Range at Tulane:

3.25 to 3.70

2.00
2.58
3.16
3.74
4.33

25-75% LSAT Score Range at Tulane:

155 to 161

120
135
150
165
180

25-75% UGPA Range at Tulane:

3.25 to 3.70

2.00
2.58
3.16
3.74
4.33

25-75% LSAT Score Range at Tulane:

155 to 161

120
135
150
165
180

Contact Information

John Giffen Weinmann Hall, 6329 Freret Street,
New Orleans, LA 70118,
United States