University of Wisconsin Law School

University of Wisconsin Law School
975 Bascom Mall, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Phone: 608.262.5914 | Fax: 608.263.3190
Email: admissions@law.wisc.edu | Website: www.law.wisc.edu

Does your law school have a nondiscrimination policy that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation?

It is the policy of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System to maintain an academic and work environment free of discrimination, discriminatory harassment, or retaliation for all students and employees. Discrimination is inconsistent with the efforts of the University of Wisconsin System to foster an environment of respect for the dignity and worth of all members of the university community and to eliminate all manifestations of discrimination within the university. The Board is also committed to the protection of individual rights under the First Amendment (and related principles of academic freedom) and in preserving the widest possible dialogue within its educational environment.

Discrimination or discriminatory harassment that is based upon an individual’s characteristics, which are protected under institution policy, state law, or federal law (“protected status”), is prohibited. Harassment is a form of discrimination and is prohibited. In addition, any form of retaliation against students or employees will not be tolerated. Any person who believes they have been subject to this type of prohibited activity should immediately report it to the appropriate institution official or office.

The following protections shall apply to this policy in regard to an individual’s characteristics (“protected status”):

Students

No student may be denied admission to, or participation in or the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any service, program, course, or facility of the system or its institutions on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, ancestry, disability, pregnancy, marital or parental status, or any other category protected by law, including physical condition or developmental disability as defined in Wisconsin Statutes §51.01(5).

Does your law school have a nondiscrimination policy that prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity?

It is the policy of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System to maintain an academic and work environment free of discrimination, discriminatory harassment, or retaliation for all students and employees. Discrimination is inconsistent with the efforts of the University of Wisconsin System to foster an environment of respect for the dignity and worth of all members of the university community and to eliminate all manifestations of discrimination within the university. The Board is also committed to the protection of individual rights under the First Amendment (and related principles of academic freedom) and in preserving the widest possible dialogue within its educational environment.

Discrimination or discriminatory harassment that is based upon an individual’s characteristics, which are protected under institution policy, state law, or federal law (“protected status”), is prohibited. Harassment is a form of discrimination and is prohibited. In addition, any form of retaliation against students or employees will not be tolerated. Any person who believes they have been subject to this type of prohibited activity should immediately report it to the appropriate institution official or office.

The following protections shall apply to this policy in regard to an individual’s characteristics (“protected status”):

Students

No student may be denied admission to, or participation in or the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any service, program, course, or facility of the system or its institutions on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, ancestry, disability, pregnancy, marital or parental status, or any other category protected by law, including physical condition or developmental disability as defined in Wisconsin Statutes §51.01(5).

Does your law school provide gender-neutral restrooms?

Yes

Does your law school have a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender student organization?

Our student organization, QLaw, has a very active role in the Law School and a strong membership. For more information, contact emily.kite@wisc.edu.

Does your law school have any openly lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender faculty members?

Yes

Does your law school have any openly lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender administrators?

Yes

Does your law school offer any academic courses primarily focused on lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender legal issues?

Constitutional Law II

This course covers civil and individual rights at the federal level. Emphasis is on the due process and equal protection clauses of the 14th Amendment, including substantive due process; privacy; discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexual preference and other characteristics; fundamental rights; and affirmative action.

Con Law: Politics and Equality

This seminar will focus on the extent to which questions of equality are determined or influenced by political processes such as legislation, initiative processes, or political activism such as demonstrations and advocacy. Have political processes defined the content of equality? Have courts imposed limitations on those political determinations of equality or defer to those determinations? The seminar will focus on politics and equality in three contexts: race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation.

Introduction to Juvenile Justice

This 1-credit course aims to provide students with a broad understanding of the US juvenile justice system and its variants among the states, while enabling students to focus on a particular topic of interest. Students will explore the origins, history, and philosophy of the juvenile court, including key cases in the evolution of delinquency law and broader law mediating the “triangular” relationship between child, family, and state. Students will become familiar with juvenile justice terminology and court and agency procedures. The course will also address empirical dimensions, including regional and national demographics; racial and socioeconomic disparities; issues of disability, gender, and sexual orientation; youth contact with intersecting public systems; and recidivism.

Equal Employment Law

Equal Employment Law examines the legal principles prohibiting discrimination in the workplace and the basic litigation strategies in employment discrimination cases. The course will focus primarily on Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (and its subsequent amendments), the basic federal statute governing employment discrimination, and the case law interpreting and applying it, with some additional attention to other federal anti-discrimination laws.

Does your law school offer the same benefits to faculty, staff, or student same-sex spouses as they do opposite-sex spouses?

No

Does your law school offer any form of domestic-partner benefits to faculty, staff, or students?

Yes

Additional Information

The University of Wisconsin Law School welcomes students from all backgrounds and experiences. Madison as a whole is a very welcoming place, and its LGBTQ community is very active and vocal in the greater Madison community.