Introducing LSAT-Flex

In light of the COVID-19 public health emergency, we are offering an online, remotely proctored version of the LSAT — called the LSAT-Flex — for test takers who were registered for the in-person April and June 2020 tests that have been canceled in the United States and Canada. We will continue to monitor the COVID-19 pandemic closely and will make other LSAT-Flex test dates available this spring and summer if the situation warrants. We plan to resume the in-person LSAT once conditions allow, in strict accordance with public health authorities and using all necessary health and safety measures. In the meantime, the remotely proctored LSAT-Flex will provide candidates with the opportunity to earn an LSAT score even if the COVID-19 crisis makes it impossible to deliver the test in-person.

The May LSAT-Flex, available to test takers registered for the in-person April 25, 2020, LSAT as of April 7, will be administered during the week of May 18, 2020. Most test takers will test on either Monday, May 18, or Tuesday, May 19, with a small number of tests occurring later in the week based on specific remote proctoring requirements. The scheduling sign-up process for the May LSAT-Flex is now open, and we encourage test takers who prefer to test at a certain time of day, or who need a specific start time due to other obligations, to try to sign up as early as possible, as slots will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. May LSAT-Flex scores will be released on the same day for all test takers, regardless of when they test during the week of May 18. Currently, we are targeting Friday, June 5, as the score release date. We will update the score release date as needed.

The June LSAT-Flex, available to test takers who were registered for the in-person June 8, 2020, LSAT as of April 29, will be administered during the week of June 14. Most test takers will test on either Sunday, June 14, or Monday, June 15, with a small number of tests occurring later in the week based on specific remote proctoring requirements. The scheduling sign-up process for the June LSAT-Flex is now open, and we encourage test takers who prefer to test at a certain time of day, or who need a specific start time due to other obligations, to try to sign up as early as possible, as slots will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. Currently, we are targeting Tuesday, June 30, as the score release date for all test takers, regardless of when they test during the week of June 14. 

We know how important the LSAT is to candidates and schools, and also to fairness and integrity in law school admission, which advances access and equity in legal education. We appreciate your patience and flexibility as we all work through this extraordinary situation together. 

Here are some key facts about the LSAT-Flex test

Registering for the LSAT-Flex

Who is eligible for the LSAT-Flex?

For the first administration of the LSAT-Flex, which will occur during the week of May 18, anyone who was registered for the April 25, 2020, LSAT as of April 7 — including March registrants who were moved to the April test when March was canceled — was automatically registered for the May LSAT-Flex, unless they chose to receive a coupon to use for a different LSAT date.

For June LSAT-Flex, which will occur during the week of June 14, anyone who was registered for the June 8, 2020, LSAT as of April 29 will be automatically registered for the June LSAT-Flex, unless they chose to receive a coupon to use for a different LSAT date.

Depending on how the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, it is possible we may administer additional LSAT-Flex exams, but it is too soon to tell.

When exactly will the test be administered?

The May LSAT-Flex will occur during the week of May 18, 2020, for test takers who were registered for the April test. We expect that most test takers will test on either Monday, May 18, or Tuesday, May 19, with a small number of tests occurring later in the week based on specific remote proctoring requirements. The scheduling sign-up process for the May LSAT-Flex is now open, and we encourage test takers who prefer to test at a certain time of day, or who need a specific start time due to other obligations, to try to sign up as early as possible, as slots will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

The June LSAT-Flex will occur during the week of June 14, 2020, for test takers who were registered for the June test in the United States and Canada. We expect that most test takers will test on either Sunday, June 14, or Monday, June 15, with a small number of tests occurring later in the week based on specific remote proctoring requirements. The scheduling sign-up process for the June LSAT-Flex is now open, and we encourage test takers who prefer to test at a certain time of day, or who need a specific start time due to other obligations, to try to sign up as early as possible, as slots will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

Will I be able to choose my testing time?

Yes, thanks to online testing, we can offer a range of start times for the LSAT-Flex, so individual test takers can choose the time that works best for their schedules from the available options. Test takers who prefer to test at a certain time of day, or who need a specific start time due to other obligations, should try to sign up as early as possible, as slots will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

The scheduling sign-up process for both the May LSAT-Flex and the June LSAT-Flex is now open.

What will LSAT-Flex cost?

The LSAT-Flex test costs the same as the standard LSAT.

Testing and Equipment Requirements

What kind of equipment do I need in order to take the LSAT-Flex?

To provide broad availability to test takers, LSAT-Flex can be accessed by test takers with a laptop or desktop computer with either a Windows or Mac operating system.

We encourage test takers to test their machine using ProctorU's convenient tool as soon as they have created their ProctorU account, and to familiarize themselves with the test’s online format and user interface by trying our free practice tests on LawHub.

If you are planning to take the June LSAT-Flex, we encourage you to learn more about the technical requirements of the remotely proctored exam and to test your equipment as soon as possible using the information and tool on this page. If you find that your equipment does not meet the technical requirements, please submit the LSAT-Flex Assistance Request form in your LSAC account no later than 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday, May 18, 2020, so that we can try to help you address your situation if possible.

What if I don't have all the equipment that I need to use the remote proctoring option (i.e., a webcam, etc.)?

LSAC is committed to ensuring that every test taker has the equipment and other resources they need to take the LSAT-Flex. For candidates who do not have the necessary computer equipment or other necessary hardware, we will work with them to try to provide loaner devices or other solutions if appropriate. 

If you are planning to take the June LSAT-Flex, we encourage you to learn more about the technical requirements of the remotely proctored exam and to test your equipment as soon as possible using the information and tool on this page. If you find that your equipment does not meet the technical requirements, please submit the LSAT-Flex Assistance Request form in your LSAC account no later than 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday, May 18, 2020, so that we can try to help you address your situation if possible.

What if I don’t have a private and/or quiet room in which to take the test due to my personal living situation during the COVID-19 emergency?

We understand that some candidates may not have access to a quiet or private room in which to take a remotely proctored test, particularly during this time of disruption and social distancing due to the COVID-19 emergency. If you do not have an appropriate place to test in your home, you can make note of your situation by submitting the LSAT-Flex Assistance Request form in your LSAC account no later than Monday, May 18, 2020, 11:59 p.m. (ET). We will work with you to try to address your needs.

How will you ensure that this LSAT-Flex doesn’t create additional barriers for underrepresented candidates, including candidates of color and candidates from economically disadvantaged backgrounds?

LSAC is committed to expanding opportunity and access for candidates who continue to be underrepresented in legal education and the legal profession. Even as we are administering the LSAT-Flex as an emergency measure to provide a safe testing alternative during the current public health emergency, we are very much aware that the COVID-19 crisis is having a disproportionate impact on many communities. We will try to ensure that every test taker has the equipment and appropriate space in which to take the LSAT-Flex, and we will work with schools and community organizations to try to ensure that the COVID-19 emergency does not set back our and our schools’ ongoing efforts to diversify legal education.

Test Format and Test Sections

What will the LSAT-Flex be like?

The LSAT-Flex will be very much like the standard LSAT. It will be composed of genuine LSAT questions that have been developed and tested in accordance with our rigorous standards and processes. To meet the anticipated demand and the needs of the remote testing solution, LSAT-Flex will be composed of three 35-minute scored sections (compared to the four 35-minute scored sections plus an unscored section in the traditional test). Every LSAT-Flex will include one section each of Reading Comprehension, Analytical Reasoning, and Logical Reasoning. Test takers will continue to take LSAT Writing separately from the multiple-choice portion of the test.

How long is the LSAT-Flex?

To meet the anticipated demand and the needs of the remote testing solution, LSAT-Flex will be composed of three 35-minute scored sections (compared to the four 35-minute scored sections plus an unscored section in the traditional test). The test will take approximately 2 hours for standard test takers.

Will there be a break during the test?

The LSAT-Flex will not include breaks for standard test takers.

Will the LSAT-Flex be inherently easier than the standard LSAT, because it is shorter and has fewer questions?

No. The individual questions and individual sections will have similar levels of difficulty as a typical LSAT. Some people may think that the shorter duration of the LSAT-Flex is a benefit. Some people may feel more pressure because they believe that the smaller number of total questions means that each question has a bigger impact. Some people may see taking an online test in their own home as a benefit; other people may see taking an online test in their own home as a source of more distraction.

Given how the COVID-19 emergency has made in-person testing temporarily impossible, we need to offer an at-home test to address the needs of candidates and schools. Due to the demands of live online proctoring, the LSAT-Flex had to be designed so it could be accomplished in approximately two hours without a break. 

Will you be making the Logical Reasoning section on the LSAT-Flex harder, to make up for the fact that there are fewer Logical Reasoning questions?

No. Speculation that we will be making the Logical Reasoning section on the LSAT-Flex harder than normal is not accurate. All sections of the LSAT-Flex, including the Logical Reasoning section, will be composed of LSAT questions that have been extensively tested and analyzed through the same rigorous item-development and section-development processes that are used for the LSAT. The Logical Reasoning section on the LSAT-Flex is not designed to be harder or easier than a typical Logical Reasoning section on a typical LSAT.

Test and Test-Taker Security

How will LSAC ensure the test is secure?

We know that the security, integrity, and validity of the LSAT are important to candidates and schools, so we are taking many steps to ensure the security of the LSAT-Flex. All LSAT-Flex test takers will be monitored by live remote proctors via the camera and microphone in the test takers’ computers. The video and audio feed will be recorded, and further reviewed by human reviewers and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques.

Can ProctorU get personal information from my computer?

No, ProctorU cannot access your computer files without your knowledge.

Accommodations

What if I was approved for testing accommodations for the in-person LSAT? Will I still have my accommodations with LSAT-Flex?

Yes. LSAC is committed to working with LSAT-Flex test takers with disabilities to see that their accommodation needs are met under the circumstances. All test takers who were approved to receive accommodations for the April 25, 2020, or June 8, 2020, LSAT test dates will receive the same or equivalent accommodations for their LSAT-Flex test being administered during the week of May 18 or June 14, respectively. LSAC will communicate directly with each registrant with approved accommodations who is scheduled to take an LSAT-Flex exam, regarding their approved accommodations in the context of LSAT-Flex.

Preparing for the LSAT-Flex

How can I prepare for the LSAT-Flex?

If you want to familiarize yourself with the format and content of the LSAT-Flex, we recommend using the free Official LSAT Prep practice tests available on LSAC’s LawHub.

If you are planning to take the June LSAT-Flex, we encourage you to learn more about the technical requirements of the remotely proctored exam and to test your equipment as soon as possible using the information and tool on this pageIf you find that your equipment does not meet the technical requirements, please submit the LSAT-Flex Assistance Request form in your LSAC account no later than 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday, May 18, 2020, so that we can try to help you address your situation if possible.

Since the proportion of Logical Reasoning questions is different on the LSAT-Flex, how should I prepare? Will Logical Reasoning questions be weighted the same as Analytical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension questions, or will they be counted double?

We are not double-counting Logical Reasoning questions on the LSAT-Flex. The Analytical Reasoning, Logical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension questions on the LSAT-Flex will be scored without weighting one section more than another. The LSAT-Flex will include roughly the same number of Analytical Reasoning, Logical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension questions, so if you find one type of question more challenging than others, you may want to focus your preparation on those questions.

Taking the LSAT-Flex

What am I allowed to have with me during LSAT-Flex?

Generally, your desktop must be clear of anything not test-related and should only have:

  • Five blank sheets of scratch paper
  • Valid ID
  • No. 2 or HB pencils
  • A highlighter
  • An eraser (no mechanical erasers or erasers with sleeves)
  • A pencil sharpener
  • Tissues
  • Beverage in plastic container or juice box (maximum size: 20 oz/591 ml). Aluminum cans are not permitted.

Each of these items must be shown to the proctor during the security check-in procedure. Both sides of the scratch paper must be shown to the proctor.

You may wear an analog (nondigital) wristwatch. The watch may not have a dedicated start/stop functionality independent of telling time, but it may have an altered faceplate and a rotating “diver’s” bezel. Timing devices of any other kind are not permitted.

What kind of identification do I need to take LSAT-Flex?

Every candidate will be required to present a valid government-issued photo ID at the beginning of the test. You must use either a passport or a government ID issued in North America. The ID must be current (or it may be expired if the expiration is within 90 days of your test date) and contain:

  • A recent and recognizable photo of you
  • Your first name (must match your registration exactly)
  • Your last name (must match your registration exactly)
  • Your date of birth

Please note that by law, U.S. military IDs cannot be photographed and thus cannot be used for this purpose.

What behaviors are prohibited?

Adhering to the highest moral and ethical standards is essential for those in the legal profession. Every test taker is required to sign a Candidate Agreement each time they take the LSAT. Please make sure you read the entire Agreement; rushing through it or ignoring any of it could have serious adverse consequences.

Generally, during the test you may not:

  • Communicate with anyone other than your proctor
  • Read aloud
  • Allow your face to leave the webcam’s view
  • Leave your seat
  • Run any prohibited software applications
  • Access any prohibited materials
  • Connect or disconnect any external storage devices

After the test you may not:

  • Share details of the test in an oral or written form, which includes sharing content on the internet or through any means or media
  • Copy or save any test material on your computer or any written notes you may have used during the test

The proctor’s instructions must be followed at all times. Any suspicious behavior noted by the proctor will be grounds for immediately ending the testing session. Terminated sessions are subject to score cancellation polices and to LSAC investigations that could lead to a finding of misconduct or irregularity. Any such finding may be shared with the law schools to which you apply.

What electronic devices are prohibited?

One cell phone is allowed for use as a mirror during check-in as instructed by your proctor, but it must be turned off and put away as instructed by the proctor before the test begins. Additional cell phones are prohibited.

Devices that cannot be in the room during LSAT-Flex include timers of any kind, electronic cigarettes, fitness-tracking devices, digital watches, calculator watches, chronograph watches (digital or nondigital), beepers, pagers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), calculators, cameras, recording devices, listening devices, headsets, and iPods and other media players. Please note that tablets, laptops, and personal computers not being used to take the test are prohibited.

Prohibited electronic devices may not be in the room during the test because they cannot be monitored via your webcam feed. Please be aware that your proctor will not allow you to test if any prohibited electronics are noted during the room scan portion of your check-in. This includes any monitors or desktop computers that happen to be on the desk you may be resting your laptop on during the test. If your session is flagged for a violation during the test, your audio and video data may be referred to for an investigation by the Misconduct and Irregularities Subcommittee. More information can be found at Misconduct & Irregularities and LSAT Candidate Agreement.

What other items are prohibited?

Test takers may not access briefcases, handbags, or backpacks of any kind. Hats or hoods, except religious apparel, may not be worn. Sunglasses may not be worn. Books, printed materials, and any notes written before the start of the test may not be used.

Other nonelectronic prohibited items can remain in the room, but they must be put away and not accessed or referenced during the test.

What if I need headphones, earplugs, or earbuds to take the test?

Unless a specified accommodation has been granted, test takers cannot wear headphones, earplugs, earbuds, or anything similar. These types of items are unable to be monitored by proctors to ensure a fair and equal testing environment. It’s LSAC’s goal to safeguard your test and score by putting this policy in place to mitigate testing irregularities that could result in the termination of your session or cancellation of your score.

Can I use other computer programs while I take LSAT-Flex?

You should not use any external programs other than the ones you typically use to make web content accessible. Examples of permissible programs include JAWS, ZoomText, Kurzweil 3000, or Dragon for screen magnification or screen reading. Be advised that utilizing features of any external program to take/type notes digitally is prohibited unless preapproved as a test accommodation.

Where should I take the test?

Choose a quiet, well-lit, and private work area where you can complete the test without interruption. Ensure that your workspace is clean and clear of all prohibited items. Your entire face must be clearly visible throughout the test. Once you begin testing, do not move out of view of the webcam or change working environments until the test is over.

What should I wear during my testing session?

Your testing session will be proctored live, and video of your session will later be reviewed by LSAC personnel. Please dress as you would if you were taking the test in person at a physical testing center. Items that can obscure your face from the proctor’s view, such as hats or hoods (with the exception of religious apparel), sunglasses, and headphones, may not be worn.

Will I be able to take breaks during the test?

You are required to remain in your seat with your face in view of the camera throughout the duration of the test. There will be a brief pause between sections, but otherwise no breaks will be given.

What happens if I lose my internet connection, or have other technical difficulties?

In most cases, the remote proctoring system will save your progress and pause the test while the technical issue is resolved, then restart the test and allow you to resume where you left off.

If your connection is interrupted during the test you will be required to complete the security check-in process again before resuming. The proctor will exercise discretion in whether to allow you to resume your testing session more than once should you continue to experience connectivity issues. If you are unable to restore your connection during your scheduled testing window, your testing session will be terminated and you will be moved to a future registration date.

What if someone else enters the room while I am taking the test?

If someone else enters the room, you must ask them to leave immediately. At the proctor’s discretion, you may continue testing once the person leaves the room. Your testing session will be flagged for further review. You will not be penalized if the interaction is brief and it is evident that no information about the test was communicated.

What if my pet enters the room while I’m taking the test?

If a pet wanders into the room while you are testing, you may continue testing. Your face must be clearly visible throughout the test, and once you begin, you cannot move out of view of the webcam until the test is over.

LSAT-Flex Scores and Law School Admission

How will my LSAT-Flex score relate to a score from the standard LSAT?

Test takers will receive a score on the standard 120-180 LSAT range as well as a percentile ranking. Because all LSAT-Flex questions are actual LSAT questions that have gone through a multi-year process of development and pre-testing, LSAT-Flex results enable LSAC to accurately predict standard LSAT scores. Scores for the LSAT-Flex will have an annotation that the test was administered in the online, remotely proctored format.

When will I get my score from the LSAT-Flex?

For the May LSAT-Flex, we are currently targeting Friday, June 5, as the score release date for all test takers, regardless of when they test during the week of May 18.

For the June LSAT-Flex, we are currently targeting Tuesday, June 30, as the score release date for all test takers, regardless of when they test during the week of June 14.

We will update these score release dates as needed.

Loaner Devices and Score Release 

If you received a loaner device from LSAC, your score will only be released once you have returned the device. Please repack the device using the box and return address label provided and ship it back to LSAC via your local UPS drop-off facility within 24 to 48 hours of completing your LSAT-Flex.

To find a UPS drop-off facility near you, visit UPS’s Find Locations page.

Can I cancel my LSAT-Flex score?

Yes. Should you decide to cancel your LSAT-Flex score, you must do so within six (6) calendar days of the date of your LSAT-Flex (prior to the scoring of your test) by contacting LSAC directly at LSACinfo@LSAC.org or 215.968.1001.

Do I still need to take LSAT Writing? When can I do that, and how?

Yes, LSAT Writing is required, and if you do not already have a completed writing sample on file, you should complete LSAT Writing as soon as possible after you take LSAT-Flex. Most law schools will not consider your file complete until you have completed LSAT Writing. LSAT Writing is included with your test registration fee and will be available in your online account beginning on the day of your LSAT-Flex administration.

Will law schools accept the LSAT-Flex as a valid alternative to the standard LSAT?

Yes. While every school has its own process for admission and candidates should always talk directly to the schools to which they are applying, we have received overwhelming support for the LSAT-Flex from our member law schools. We have not received any indication from any member school that they will not accept the LSAT-Flex as a valid part of a candidate’s application. To the contrary, we have heard from many, many schools thanking LSAC for providing the LSAT-Flex so that candidates have the opportunity to test at a time when the COVID-19 crisis has made in-person testing impossible.

Is the LSAT-Flex an accurate predictor of a candidate’s performance in law school, given that the proportion of Logical Reasoning questions is different on the LSAT-Flex than it is on the LSAT?

Yes. The LSAT-Flex will be composed of LSAT questions that have been extensively tested and analyzed through the same rigorous item-development and section-development processes that are used for the LSAT. While the proportion of Logical Reasoning questions on the LSAT-Flex is different than the proportion on a standard LSAT, the LSAT-Flex will provide law schools with a valuable assessment of a candidate's skill level on the critical reading and reasoning skills that are vital to success in law school, just as the standard LSAT does. Because the LSAT-Flex is a test taken remotely, scores for the LSAT-Flex will have an annotation that the test was administered in the online, remotely proctored format. As always, we want to stress that both the LSAT and the LSAT-Flex should be used in conjunction with a candidate’s academic achievement, work experience, and life experience in a holistic law school admission process. 

Future LSAT-Flex Administrations

Will you be giving additional LSAT-Flex test administrations in July if the COVID-19 emergency is still affecting large parts of the country?

If necessary, yes. We are monitoring the COVID-19 situation very closely and will follow the direction of public health authorities in determining whether the July LSAT must be canceled in some or all locations. We are making contingency plans so that no matter what the COVID-19 situation is in July, candidates will have the opportunity to test. If necessary, another remotely proctored LSAT-Flex could be a part of the solution. 

Will this test format be offered over the long term even when things get better?

It is too soon to speculate on whether the LSAT-Flex format will continue to be offered after the COVID-19 pandemic is no longer a threat to public health and safety. Right now, we are focused on trying to ensure that everyone who wants to take the LSAT to pursue their legal education goals has the opportunity to test, even during this unprecedented time of disruption due to the COVID-19 emergency.