LSAT FAQs

Before the Test

Can I cancel my LSAT registration and receive a refund?

If you send us a signed and completed Refund Request form (PDF) by the refund deadline associated with your test date, you are entitled to a partial refund. We will also accept a signed, dated letter as long as we receive it by the appropriate deadline date.

Can I withdraw my LSAT registration after the refund deadline has passed?

Yes. You may withdraw your LSAT registration in the LSAT Status section of your LSAC.org account once the refund deadline has passed and until 11:59 p.m. (ET) the night before the test. No refund will be issued, and your LSAT registration cannot be reinstated once withdrawn.

I have a fee waiver. How do I withdraw my registration?

You may withdraw your LSAT registration in the LSAT Status section of your LSAC.org account once the refund deadline has passed. You must complete your withdrawal by 11:59 p.m. (ET) the night before the test. Once your registration is withdrawn, you may register for another LSAT that is administered within your two-year fee waiver period.

How do I make changes to my biographical information (e.g., name, date of birth) after I have registered for the LSAT?

Complete, sign, and send us the LSAC Biographical Information Changes form (PDF), with a copy of your ID if you need to correct your name, date of birth, or Social Security/Social Insurance number. You can make any other changes right in your LSAC.org account. Note: To be admitted to the test center, the first and last name listed on your ID must match exactly the first and last name printed on your LSAT Admission Ticket.

Under what circumstances would I be ineligible to take the LSAT?

If you served as a test center staff member for the LSAT, you may not take the LSAT in the subsequent 24-month period. If you plan to take the LSAT within 24 months of having either supervised an LSAT administration or worked as part of the testing staff at an LSAT administration, you must notify us when you register for the test. LSAC will review the request and either honor the registration or offer an alternative test center or date. We must receive your notification by the registration deadline of the requested test date. Failure to abide by this requirement may result in the initiation of a misconduct and irregularities proceeding.

In addition, if you do not agree to the terms and conditions of the LSAT Candidate Agreement, you will not be able to print your admission ticket and will not be permitted to take the LSAT.

How many times may I take the LSAT?

LSAC is committed to providing a fair and equitable testing program and maintaining the integrity of the LSAT. We will be updating our test-taking limit policy later this summer, and it will go into effect with the September 2019 LSAT administration. We estimate that this policy will impact a small number of people — less than 1 percent of all LSAT test takers.

Starting with the September 2019 test administration, test takers will be permitted to take the LSAT:

  • Three times in a single testing year (the testing year goes from June 1 to May 31).
  • Five times within the current and five past testing years (the period in which LSAC reports scores to law schools).
  • A total of seven times over a lifetime.
  • This policy is forward-looking, not retroactive. Tests taken prior to September 2019 will not count against these numerical limits. 

In addition, test takers will not be permitted to retake the LSAT if they have already scored a 180 (perfect score) within the current and five past testing years, the period in which LSAC reports scores to law schools. This aspect of the policy will be applied retroactively.

There will be an appeals process for test takers who have special circumstances and want to request an exception to this policy.

After the Test

How can I inquire about a test question?

If, while taking the LSAT, you find what you believe to be an error or ambiguity in a test question that affects your response to the question, report it to the test supervisor as soon as you finish the test and write immediately to:

Law School Admission Council
Test Development Group
662 Penn Street
PO BOX 40
Newtown, PA 18940-0040 USA

Email: LSATTS@LSAC.org

LSAC will respond to all reasonable inquiries about test questions, but to be entitled to the formal review process described in the LSAC Policies and Procedures Governing Challenges to Law School Admission Test Questions, your inquiry must be made within 90 days of the date on the LSAT Candidate Report and must include the reasons why you believe there is an error or ambiguity. Your inquiry should include your name and address, the number of the question, the section in which it occurred, and the question type. LSAT Test Specialists will review your inquiry and send a written response. If the response does not answer your concerns, you can request further review by a panel of expert reviewers not otherwise associated with LSAC.

When will I receive my test score?

If you have an LSAC.org account, you will receive your score by email approximately three to four weeks after taking the test. Please keep your email address current in your LSAC.org account to receive your score promptly.

How do I cancel my score?

Beginning the day after the test, you may cancel your score on the LSAT Status page of your LSAC.org account. This option will only be available to you within six calendar days after the test. The deadline to cancel your score online will be 11:59 p.m. (ET) on the sixth day after your LSAT date. More information is available at Canceling Scores.

How will my scores be reported?

We will automatically report the results of all LSATs in your file, including cancellations and absences, since June 1, 2014. The scores are averaged and are also listed separately. Scores earned prior to June 2014 are not available to anyone for any purpose.

How long should I keep records?

Because some state bar associations inquire about the law school admission records of those seeking admission to the bar, you should maintain complete copies of all law school application records throughout the admission cycle and your law school career.