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Future JD Students

LGBT Survey Results: University of Florida, Fredric G. Levin College of Law

Nondiscrimination Policy

Nondiscrimination is not only the best and morally correct course of action; it is university policy.

The university is committed to nondiscrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations, and veteran status as protected under the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act. This commitment applies in all areas to students, academic personnel (AP), technical, executive, administrative, and managerial support (TEAMS) staff, university support personnel system (USPS) personnel, and other personnel services (OPS) employees. The university realizes that it must continue to intensify its concern and devote itself to the elimination of conditions from which discrimination springs. In this respect, the university accepts the responsibility for solving problems related to these matters. Accordingly, the university will continue to search for the most appropriate ways and means to provide an effective and enduring contribution to the improvement of these relationships.

The Levin College of Law faculty has also approved the following statement: “In addition, the College of Law is committed to nondiscrimination with respect to gender identity and gender expression.” Faculty Minutes, 4-28-10.

LGBT Student Organization(s)

UF Law Outlaw

Outlaw provides LGBT students and their supporters an outlet to express and discuss their views. Members work to increase community awareness of issues relating to gender and sexual orientation and hold regular meetings and numerous awareness events throughout campus.

For more information, contact:

Danaya Wright
Phone: 352.273.0946
Email: wrightdc@law.ufl.edu

LGBT Affairs at the University of Florida

LGBT Affairs strives to educate, advocate, and support LGBT people and issues at the University of Florida and in the Gainesville community. Through student-centered programming, outreach, community building, and advocacy, we are committed to creating a safe and developmentally supportive and affirming campus-community for students, staff, faculty, and alumni of all sexual orientations, gender identities, and expressions.

LGBTQ+ Advisory Committee

The LGBTQ+ Advisory Committee serves as a vehicle for a systematic and periodic assessment of the quality of life of LGBT individuals at the university and makes recommendations regarding the need for educational programming, establishment of specific services and programs, and other similar matters. Additionally, the committee examines and recommends revisions in university policies and procedures having potentially negative consequences for LGBT individuals, and serves as a forum in which various individuals and groups can express concerns related to issues of homophobia and transphobia.

LGBT Faculty

Danaya Wright
Phone: 352.392.2211
Email: wrightdc@law.ufl.edu

LGBT Administrator(s)

None

LGBT Course(s)

  • Advanced Topics in Family Law Seminar: The seminar will be devoted to advanced topics and cutting-edge issues in family law. The seminar will permit students to pursue a particular topic in family law by conducting a significant, in-depth research project, which will be presented for critique and feedback to the seminar participants. The seminar will focus initially on readings concerning contemporary issues in family law, followed by students’ research and presentations. Projects may include conventional research papers, roughly equivalent to a law review student comment or note, or may propose any equivalent project in any form with the consent of the instructor, e.g., an advocacy project or legislative proposal.
  • Adoption Law: This course will involve an exploration of the history of the American law of adoption, adoption procedures, and the fundamental legal principles of adoption, covering cases, statutes, and constitutional issues. Topics will include relative, grandparent, and stepparent adoption, as well as the adoption of children in state custody, private intermediary, and agency adoptions, international adoptions, postadoption issues, and wrongful adoption. Adoption is an important part of family law practice, with many complex issues that are addressed only superficially in general family law courses. This course will provide a foundation in adoption law for private practitioners as well as for public interest attorneys and child advocacy specialists. In addition, emerging and evolving areas of adoption law will be explored, including open adoptions, transracial adoptions, sexual orientation issues in adoption, and adoption by nontraditional families.
  • Cross Cultural Legal Counseling: This course introduces understandings of deep cultural values that are broadly accepted in other disciplines (e.g., cultural anthropology, business, psychology, education, and medicine) and applies them to lawyer-client counseling situations—in particular, those situations where the lawyer’s cultural values differ from the client’s.
  • Family Law: Covers the law of the family, including cases, statutes, and constitutional precedents relating to marriage, divorce, nontraditional families, child custody, child and spousal support, adoption, and reproductive technologies. Students will complete exercises in negotiation and drafting of documents in a simulated family law transaction.
  • Law & Social Movement: This upper-level seminar will address several themes. The overarching focus of the class will consist of the exploration of historical forces that have caused dramatic changes in civil rights law. In order to examine this topic, the course will present students with a detailed analysis of constitutional and, to a lesser degree, statutory law concerning discrimination on the basis of race, sex, and sexual orientation. After exhaustively covering the law in these areas, the course will examine literature from social sciences and legal theory in order to understand the historical mechanisms that influenced changes in these areas of law. The course will also consider whether courts respond to social movement activity and whether they should do so. The course materials will include cases, statutes, law review articles, and readings from historians and social scientists.
  • Law of Sex and Sexual Orientation: An exploration of the power of the state to regulate sexual morality. The course will cover the constitutional protection of liberty, equality, and freedom of speech as applied to the context of sexual identity, orientation, and expression. Topics will include restrictions on private consensual sexual behavior and sex-related expression, gays in the military, and same-sex marriage.
  • Perspectives in Family Law: Covers the law of the family, including cases, statutes, and constitutional precedents relating to marriage, divorce, nontraditional families, child custody, child and spousal support, adoption, and reproductive technologies. Students will complete exercises in negotiation and drafting of documents in a simulated family law transaction.
  • Workers’ Compensation and Other Employment Rights: Rights of employees and duties of employers under modern social programs, including workers’ compensation, wage and hour regulations, Social Security, old age, disability and medical problems, and antidiscrimination laws.

Domestic-Partner or Same-Sex Marriage Benefits

All benefits-eligible faculty and staff are eligible for domestic partner health insurance. It is available to both same- and opposite-sex partners as well as to children of the employee and partner as long as the required criteria outlined on the domestic partner affidavit is satisfied.

For more information, visit Spouses, Domestic Partners, and Other Dependents or contact:

Benefits
PO Box 115007
Gainesville, FL 32611-5007

Phone: 352.392.2HRS
Email: benefits@ufl.edu

Additional Information

Students, faculty, and staff at the Levin College of Law are part of an active and diverse community. Your interaction with others from varied backgrounds and experiences leads to a better education and healthier understanding of how the world works and contributes to valuable dialogue in our increasingly global and multicultural world. Indeed, success in the twenty-first century workplace requires a mature understanding of diversity and community. We urge you during your time here to reach beyond your comfort zone by interacting with others very different from yourself in terms of race, religion, class, belief system, gender, and sexual orientation.

Back to LGBT Survey Link

May 21, 2014, 13:28 PM

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